Soufriere Day Tour: Drive-in Volcano, Piton Waterfall and Diamond Botanical Garden

[Warning: This is a bit of a Grumpy Old Lady post] We wouldn’t want to leave Soufriere without seeing everything there is to see in this part of the world. So yesterday we decided to spring for a taxi ride around the area, visiting the drive-in volcano, the Piton Waterfall, and the Diamond Botanical Garden and Waterfall. Charles picked us up at 11 and off we zoomed to the first stop, the volcano.

Billed as the world’s only drive-in volcano, this place looks more like a small strip mine, a white and orange bald patch on a hill in which small pools of grayish-black water bubble and steam. It’s the only venting area in what is a gigantic caldera encompassing the town of Soufriere and the surrounding area.

Coming off the main highway, the stench of rotten eggs filled the air as we approached. At the entrance were several guys selling rasta paraphernalia and gigantic conch shells; before we even get got to the gate, they were on us to buy something. Rolling down the road a few hundred meters we stopped at another shopping area and were immediately greeted by a guide who will “show us around and give us information about the area”.

In this country every site, whether rain forest, garden, or waterfall, has an entrance fee and it is almost impossible to go anywhere without a guide; one cannot hike in the forests or on the hills without a local person guiding. We can’t enter into a garden or, indeed, go almost anywhere without someone there to guide us, even when it is not at all necessary or wanted. And, of course, it’s made clear by large signs that each of these guides expects a tip (and not a small tip, either, something substantial). [Even downtown, people approach us in the street, ask where we’re going, say they will take us there, even when we can see the place 20 feet down the road, and then expect a tip – we are walking wallets and almost every interaction is about money]. In the various sites I have no objection to someone guiding me, if there’s a reason for it (like telling me something about the place that I don’t know or can’t figure out for myself). But, at the volcano, there’s no reason to have a guide because the area is completely self-explanatory and the path to the edge of the sulphur ponds is only a hundred meters or so. Anyway, to me the volcano seemed much ado about nothing …

Back in the car, we cruised past Malgretoute Beach and turned off on the way to Jalousie to the Piton Warm-Hot Waterfall, where, this time guideless, we walked a few hundred meters into the rainforest and down a set of steep stairs to a concrete viewing platform with two smallish mineral water pools from where we could see the waterfall and, behind, out across the water to Anse Chastanet.

It was very pleasant to sit here in this green and shady space and watch the water spill down the hill into the pools below.

On the way to our final stop, we paused at the top of the hill to look out over the town, purchase some more souvenirs, and drove through Soufriere to the Diamond Garden.

Here, once again, a guide scooped us up as soon as we emerged from the car and led us, way more quickly than I’d like, on a whirl wind tour through part of the garden, then waited somewhat impatiently for a tip, before hustling back to the entrance to pick up more tourists – we were not very happy.

Anyway, while inside the garden we saw some interesting plants, especially a gorgeous Red Torch Ginger, and the usual tropical flowers, birds of paradise, crab claws in different colours, and tropical plants such as Bromeliads. The garden is also a bird sanctuary and Ty was lucky enough to see a parrot.

By the time the tour was finished two and a half hours later, we felt as if we’d been metaphorically hoisted by our ankles and shaken to extract every last coin from our pockets; we’d spent 400EC$ (about $160), way too much for the “Soufriere Experience”, in my opinion. [While the Tet Paul tour was worth the money spent, (and we wanted to support this excellent project), I can’t really say the same about this day’s visits]. The thing about this town is that everyone wants a piece of us; of course, it’s been the same everywhere, but the people are particularly persistent about it here. They will not let us be; every day the same people want us to pay them for something, whether necklaces, weed, home brew, boat trips, taxis, or walks down the road. The relentlessness of it gets tiresome. I understand and agree that the local people should benefit from the tourists who come here and, unfortunately, most of the visitors who arrive on boats are loaded onto minibuses and driven around without being given time to walk around the town and spread the wealth. This, I think, is really the shits; however, that said, the constant hassle is also off-putting. But we still like the place.

See more pics here.