Easing into a Northern Fall

I am back on the hiking trail, getting some last walks in before the snow flies. The first two weekends in September we have gone to the Beatton Hills between Fort St John and Cecil Lake to climb up and along the ridge that fronts the river valley.

Sharla, Sandra, and Irene are mountain goats and so are the three dogs we travelled with, Gus, Kaiser, and Bear. Getting up to the top of the ridge is STEEP and, since the soil is so dry, slippery!

Although not nearly as long a trip as up to Battleship Mountain the trail is almost as steep.

There are several small dips before the trail finally reaches the top. Along the way we pass many different types of berry bushes and, of course, the Trembling Aspen trees.

Thankfully, the berries this year have been very lush so any bears in the area will be well-fed and not interested in us! (Especially now that I have seen the movie Backcountry, I am happy that a bear has not yet intruded into my space!) Good old Gus, the 14 year old miniature Schnauzer, continues to amaze me with his stamina.

In the far distance of the photo below looking west you can see the highway that leads back to the highway that leads back to FSJ.

Looking east you can see the Beatton River down below.

The photo below shows a mini-ridge partway up the hill.

And way down below you can see one of the vehicles parked along the roadway.

We keep climbing higher and higher …

Finally we reach the top and the ridge that runs along the hilltop.

The dogs are as happy as we are to be finished with the onerous uphill journey.

We saw a couple of crows harassing a hawk in flight.

At the very top is a pumpjack, a small oil well. These are everywhere in the landscape here.

The landscape is really beautiful; we rested here and had our lunch over looking this valley.

Far down below was the ubiquitous wrecked car abandoned in the fields.

Across the highway from the hill on which we are hiking is another matching hill and on its ridge, is Sandra’s house, below silver with red roofs.

I was a bit nervous about the idea of coming down the same way we went up, because it was so steep and slippery, but we found another trail leading off to the left which Sharla believed would lead us down to the river through the forest of aspen.

After one wrong turn, lo and behold, yes, the trail did take us down, albeit very steeply (but not as long as the one that brought us up) to the river below.

Another weekend, another killer trip up the Beatton hills, this time with Sharla, Shelley, and Sharon.

This day was hotter, a perfect late summer day.

We had a bit of difficulty with this selfie, trying to get all four of us, plus the background, into the frame, good for quite a few giggles.

Gus was apparently really bagged after last week’s walk, but here he was back again this time for more.

As you can see, the water in the river is very low – it has been a hot and dry summer here.

Finally, almost all the landscaping is done around our complex. Unfortunately, the landscaping company just left most of the plants sitting around in pots for weeks without water so many of the trees and shrubs they finally planted were already dead. Unbelievable. No-one seems to care about this except me – I find it atrocious.

It has been very dry here for weeks and the forest fire risk is very high. Ty & I were in Fish Creek Urban Forest for the first time in a couple of months and I was very surpised at the number of dead conifer trees.

Down closer to the creek there were fewer dry, dead trees and more greenery. Here, too, the soil is dry, dry, dry, but, amazingly, there is still some wet mud in spots down close to the water. The Creek is very shallow right now, too.

We had a good long walk, two loops around the lower portion of the park, before heading up and out on what proved to be a very hot Labour Day.

At the beginning of this week the temperature dropped to 10 degrees with an arctic wind blowing; I was convinced that winter was coming … but yesterday it was back up to somewhere in the 20s, hot and dry. Things change up here fast in the north country!

Artists continue to join me in the gallery to share their creative journey; so far this month, mixed media and textile artist Barb Daley and painter Laurie Yates, a retired school teacher, have been in, sharing their process with gallery visitors.

Barb is working on some fabric pieces for a group show in November called Varieties of Abstraction. These are part of her homage to Leonard Cohen and the exhibition dates nicely coordinate with the anniversary of his death.

Barb’s mom Jane continued to join her to share stories about the olden days and her life as a tailor back in the day.

Laurie decided to work on some paintings while in residence.

It’s great to see the young kids in the gallery getting interested in how to be creative. Here is Sarah, one of my yoga teachers, with her son Henry who is in his first year of an arts-based preschool held at the Cultural Centre.

The gallery’s furnace is being replaced, which has left the backroom in disarray and meant that everything in storage had to be brought out and put into the multipurpose room next door until the messy, noisy, and smelly (of metal being cut) job is finished.

Laurie braved the less-than-pleasant circumstances to share her ideas with interested folks on her second visit.

I mentioned a while back that I was doing the set projections for the Alcan Craze, a play dealing with the building of the Alaska Highway here 75 years ago. My work on it is done – I have created about 34 short video clips, from 6 seconds to 3 minutes long; now I just have to wait to see how the images look when projected at the tech rehearsal next weekend.

Alcan Craze of '42

I attended one of the rehearsals at the Cultural Centre to see how things were going so far. Director Michael Armstrong and playwright Deb Butler were being interview for the local shaw Cable channel.

The set is pretty minimalist because the projections, on the white cyc (curtain) at the back, will in essence set the scene and elaborate on the action.

Some of the folks from Buddy Holly are also in this production, as are many of the back stage personnel.

I’m looking forward to seeing everything come together at the tech rehearsal.

The weekend of Sept 8-9 saw us rolling down the road again to Grande Prairie to get another art fix. Ty had the week off so we decided to hit the openings in the city, featuring several of the Fort St John and Dawson artists.

Several of us met up at Earl’s, just next door to the Sandman where Ty & I had booked a room – that was very convenient!

Although Ty & I have been through this city a few times, we have never actually investigated the downtown scene so this was the perfect opportunity. GP is about the size of Nanaimo, although with fewer people (about 61,000), and is completely flat. It has three galleries, The Art Gallery of Grande Prairie (below – a contemporary art facility that is the second largest in Alberta),

the Centre for Creative Arts, housed in what looks like an old school building, and the Grant Berg Gallery, a commercial space.

The Centre for Creative Arts was hosting two shows opening this night, the Peace Region Federation of Canadian Artists Moody Hues show and a solo exhibition of paintings by a local GP artist.

In addition to the exhibition spaces, this place also has a gift shop and several studios in which to take classes and produce one’s own work for an extremely reasonable price.

Since both openings were happening the same evening, and the two exhibition spaces are very close to one another, people could go back and forth between the two, which was handy.

We slipped out the back door of the Centre and headed over to the AGGP, a recently renovated and expansive facility in the Montrose Cultural Centre. Interestingly, the main floor gallery was just getting set up for an exhibition of Lyndal Osborne, an installation artist from Edmonton whose work I really admire. She used to be a printmaker but has been working in very large-scale multi-media installations with organic media for the past twenty odd years. See her work here. I curated a show at the Nanaimo Art Gallery many moons ago that included Lyndal’s work.

A really good turnout of people from Fort St John and Dawson Creek came out for Mary Parslow and the collaborative exhibition of mary mottishaw and kit fast, as well as the pit-fired ceramic work of GP artist Ken Lumbis. It was great to see so many people I knew make the 5 hour return treck to support their fellow artists. Artists are always very grateful to the folks who come out to celebrate the sometimes years-long creative process that is finally unveiled at these openings.

mary and kit are conceptual artists whose work addresses human interventions in the landscape and the legacy of industrial oil and gas production in the Peace region.

Mary’s prints looked beautiful; unfortunately, for picture-taking at least, there were too many people in the room to get good pics of the works itself.

Ken Lumbis, whose works will also be featured in the Varieties of Abstraction show at our gallery in November, has a nice selection of his smaller ceramic wall pieces installed downstairs.

We had intended to hit the Grant Berg gallery on our way out of town back to FSJ but ended up leaving before the Gallery opened so that will have to wait for another visit.

We stopped for lunch in Dawson at a 50s style diner that had been especially made for the restaurant proprietor in Alberta, complete with chrome fixtures and Buddy Holly music.

And, finally for this report, yesterday on a wonderfully summery day, Sandra, her inlaws, and I visited the shores of the Peace river on the property of one of her friends, to get an overview of Site C and its progress. Sandra’s friend Esther is a horsewoman and owns 1 or 2 sections of land along the river ridge.

We walked across her well-mown fields down to the ridge overlooking the river, accompanied by what looked like an Anatolian sheepdog, a huge and friendly beast.

From here we could see quite far in each direction and observe the work that has been done on preparing the dam site. We wondered whether Ty was driving around in his pickup as we were watching from above.

 

The treaty 8 bands have a watch-shack here, with a telescope set up to observe the goings on below.

Two photos by Don Hoffman adorn the walls and remind visitors of what the river valley used to look like before construction began.

See more here and here.