From Fall to Winter overnight …

Well, it’s been a fast and furious couple of weeks up here in the north country; we’ve gone from late summer to mid-winter between the middle of September and the beginning of October. The wind is strong in this part of the world, and if it’s blowing from the north, cold!

Although I don’t think anyone can accuse the city of FSJ of being beautiful, there are areas in the surrounding countryside that are lovely. And along the ridge just north of the city there are some places with beautiful views out over the Peace Valley.

On the bypass road that runs around the edges of the city, we found an abandoned farmstead with decrepit old wooden structures rotting in the fields.

Fall lasted about two weeks and the aspen trees turned yellow and gold.

We have been spending quite a bit of time with the cast and crew of the Buddy Holly Story, attending rehearsals at “The Space”, a quonset hut on the edge of town that serves Stage North as a rehearsal space.

Here is the Director Blair Scott in action, getting the Hayriders ready to go for their first song of the show.

Have a listen here. To plays the videos, first click on the image, then click again to start the video. Unfortunately, there was a bit of a problem with the sound on my video towards the end …

And here are Buddy Holly and the Crickets, going from country to rock ‘n roll.

Ty enters stage right carrying a keyboard. We are really enjoying being part of this production; it’s been great fun!

We are both working on the projections for the show, and have spent a fair bit of time in the theatre of the North Peace Cultural Centre where the show will take place the last two weekends of October.

We have put together two large projection screens from king size beds sheets sewn by the Sew it Yourself shop, four metal pipes, and lots of hardware. They will be hung on either side of the stage for videos which I edited of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper playing at the end of the show. This necessitates three laptops, three digital projectors, 150 meters of HDMI cord, and lots of metal hardware.

Oliver, the General Manager of the Cultural Centre, has been very generous with his time in helping us to put this all together.

Here’s a shot of the top of one screen, showing how it’s attached.

This is what it looks like with the big back screen and one of the side screens; the third one will hang down from stage right on the other side.

Here’s a little promo video I put together for the show.

Back when it was still Fall, we spend a bit of time getting to know the neighbourhood, strolling through the subdivisions around here.

This artificial pond has been made just down the road from our place. We are both amazed at the number of RVs parked in people’s driveways here; on some streets every home has a gigantic motorhome or RV next to the house.

I started taking bellydance lessons about a month ago at the Studio2Stage dance lesson emporium, with Suzon Tremblay, a very talented dancer and artist.

Unfortunately, my picture of her is not in focus.

Bellydancing is much more difficult than I thought, with hundreds of moves, some of which are difficult for this old, inflexible body. I am bad, but hope to get better during the course of the class.

Winter came early, very early – September 30, to be precise …

Here’s the view from our kitchen window. Although it’s no longer snowing today, there’s still snow on the ground and more expected tomorrow. We are having the snow tires installed this weekend. Already the temperature is hovering between 0 and minus 5 and it’s only the beginning of October. I wanted to see a snowy landscape, just not this early in the season!

I still need to get some serious winter gear; here’s a picture from the outside of the rehearsal space on the east edge of town.

Other than that, I am working on my landscape photo series and getting ready to do some painting. The landscapes are getting more fanciful – here’s a taste.

Aspen Landscape with Eastern Phoebe & Harvest Moon

Aspen Landscape with Phases of the Moon

 

Greetings from the North!

The view flying into Fort St John. Wow, it’s been a fast and furious month since I’ve landed in FSJ with Aran the cat in his carrier. The beast turned out to be a pretty good traveller, once he got over the shock of going through security at Vancouver airport.

After a pretty good dose of culture shock for the first few weeks, I am starting to settle in up here. I have decided to focus on the things I like every day rather than feel sad about what I’ve left behind. First up on that list is the people that I have met here, a wonderful bunch of very friendly and active folks from many different facets of the community, artists, theatre folks, yoginis, environmental people …

One of the very first things we did upon my arrival was to walk around the neighbourhood and check out the prospects. There are two sweet little “metaphysical” stores, Earthly Treasures and The Wisdom Tree, selling crystals and other goodies for spiritual contemplation.

The Arts Post is a nice studio space with a very active group of potters.

Possibly I might try to get back into ceramics here – the studio is well set up.

I have also connected with the Flying Colours Art Association, a wonderful and welcoming group of artists who have workshops, exhibitions, and a great studio to work in every second week. I hope to get into the studio and do some painting by the end of September; at the moment I’m working on a new series of infrared photographic images of the northern landscape. Here’s an example:

peace-river

On the main drag through town is the Blacksmith Yoga Community studio, in the green building in the picture below. It’s a vinyasa studio, a style of yoga that I used to do with Kathryn Turnbull at the Roundhouse in Vancouver, but more demanding than what I’m used to. The first few sessions left me with pretty stiff muscles!

We are living in a new area at the western edge of the city, where townhomes and condo buildings have been constructed – at the moment we are in the middle of a construction site with trucks and machines coming and going. The number and size of the pickup trucks around here is amazing; even though our new car is the biggest I’ve ever had, it seems tiny in comparison. It still feels very decadent to me to just be able to hop in the car and go wherever I want after not having had a car for five years. (Thank you so much to all the friends who have so kindly given us lifts places over those years!)

Our unit is the second from the end in the left-hand building pictured below.

We checked out the Fall Fair north of the city last month, getting a feel for the country life.

A really active group here is the Spinners, Weavers, and Quilters and they had a big display of their work in one of the buildings.

We watched the cattle show, in which various groups of people brought in their beasts and paraded them around the ring for the judge’s assessment, some more skilfully than others.

We also saw some of the sheepdog show, with various doggies shepherding sheep into pens.

Horse-riding is also a big thing in these parts.

I had ridden past the Fort Bowling building on my bike when heading to the yoga studio but was unsure if it was actually in business or not. But, yes, it is definitely in business and we gave it a whirl. My arm was not really up to it, though – will have to strengthen the muscles to up my game.

It was fun, except for the burning pain in my forearm! Check out my style – I actually got a few strikes (a few less than Ty, though …)

On the northern edge of town is an urban forest called Fish Creek, a nice place to walk on a sunny day. I was a bit nervous about the prospect of bears, though; however, we did not see any evidence of them that day.

One of things that I do love here is the aspen trees; they are everywhere up here. We noticed right away that the trees are much, much smaller here.

Very close to the city is Beatton Park and Charlie Lake, a lovely picnic area.

There are paved separated bike paths along the main street and around the perimeter of the city, a very nice feature.

Since it is mostly flat, the city is pretty easy to get around on bikes. And not very much traffic, either, compared to what we’re used to.

On Ty’s week off, we took a road trip to Grande Prairie, Alberta, to get snow tires and see a bit of the countryside. The journey takes about two and a half hours each way, travelling south through Dawson Creek and Beaverlodge. We stopped and checked out the Philip J Curry Dinosaur museum in Wembley, Alta on the way.

This area is full of fossils, some of which are on display here.

Ty is not trying to steal a dinosaur bone; this pit is for visitors to practice being paleontologists by dusting the dirt off bones.

On the way back, we stopped in at the Dawson Creek Art Gallery, located in a decommissioned grain silo.

One of the really fun things that we’re doing is getting involved with Stage North, the local theatre company. They are producing the Buddy Holly Story, on stage for two weeks the end of October. Ty and I are helping out with projections and as stage hands. Ty is designing a projection system for videos that will play during the performance.

I’ve been to one rehearsal so far and thought it was great. Here are a couple of video clips of three of the songs they’re working on.

https://goo.gl/photos/FbeELESUrMGCbhnf8

https://goo.gl/photos/3yWnEo6vXowpxWgG6

Good times!