Snow, Trees, and Art

This just in:

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It does not get light here until 9 am and this little part of the world does not do Daylight Savings Time; the time never changes here in FSJ.

At its highest point this time of year, the sun does not come very far above the horizon, meaning that the shadows are always long, even at noon or 1 in the afternoon. That makes for good picture taking! Downside: we only get 7.5 hours of sunlight at this time of year; it gets dark at around 4:30 pm; upside: it’s often sunny.

When the sun is out, and it’s -17 (as recorded by my car’s dashboard), and the trees are covered in hoar frost and snow, the landscape is absolutely stunning.

I stop my car every second block and take pictures of the trees – I have never seen anything like it before. In the morning just as the sun was rising, the trees were gilded pink and purple.

I thought -17 was cold … and it is … but it’s going down to -31 in the next couple of days. This wonderful news gave me the incentive to empty, put away, and clear out our garage of all the still-packed boxes that we haven’t bothered to open since we got here. One of the reasons we decided to rent this place was because of its tandem garage, a garage that takes two vehicles in a row (those of you who saw Ty’s video of this place before we moved in will remember his joy about the garage …). Since it will be so cold, Ty’s truck can’t be parked on the road anymore; it needs to be plugged in if it sits outside overnight. So, now we have room enough in the garage for both vehicles.

The parking spots here are enormous, seemingly twice as big as the ones down south, making it much easier to park the ol’ car. This is because the big truck is king in this part of the world. (My friend Sandy told me that the truck is the sports car of the north). Amazingly, though, some people still manage to take up two spots when they park … (There actually is a Facebook page called “I live in Fort St John and I park like an a**hole” devoted to images of such parking jobs). Also, when the temperature goes down to -17 or below, people leave their vehicles running while they go about their business, some with dogs inside – coming from a “no idle” city, I have not gotten used to this practice – still find it disconcerting.

Eliza and I hiked through Beatton Park the other day on the snowshoe trails. These trails are maintained by the FSJ cycling club and the Whiskey Jack ski club, both very active in this area. We spent about two hours walking through the forested area and noticing how the vegetation changed from aspens to birch to spruce trees depending on the elevation and amount of light.

Eliza also pointed out strange bruises or craterous indentations in some of the trees; these were the marks left by moose eating chunks of the trees.

We also saw evidence of woodpecker holes in many of the trees. Apparently there are also snowshoe hares in these woods, although we did not see any this day. (Miep has seen moose up close on her acreage near the park – apparently they are enormous beasts).

Charlie Lake is frozen and covered with snow and its flat white surface is absolutely gorgeous. It’s not yet frozen deep enough to skate on but will be soon.

A friend from yoga invited me over to her place for lunch and a walk in the country near the FSJ airport. Sandra’s property is huge and fronts the Beatton River – on a sunny afternoon it was absolutely gorgeous.

Christmas time is busy in this part of the world with many craft and artisan markets. I took in three of them the other day, at the North Peace Cultural Centre, The Peace Gallery North, and 10,000 Villages above the MAC Thrift store. Lots of soap makers, wood workers, jewelers, bakers, clothing makers, and artists had their work out for display and sale for a bustling holiday crowd. I felt a bit sorry for the people whose booths were upstairs at the Cultural Centre, especially the soap vendor near the back, because most folks did not venture up the stairs.

Patrick, Ty & I took in the Canadian Country Christmas show at the Lido Theatre. Originally the town’s movie theatre, the Lido has been converted into a dinner theatre and show space with booths and tables on a tiered base.

We had seats right down close to the action, but on the side so we did not get blasted by the music speakers. Country legends (none of whom I knew, not being a country music afficionado) and a couple of local talents serenaded the sold out crowd with western music on a mightily cold – 23 night.

Sandy & I headed out to Dawson Creek for the second day of Sandy’s 2 day workshop of tree portraits a la David Langevin. We stayed overnight in Dawson with Mary and Charlie in their delightful wooden cabin-like house on 10 acres overlooking the city, a house filled with art and warmth.

Almost everyone we’ve met here has a house whose wall are covered with art – it is really great to see. Mary and Charlie are printmakers and have, in addition to paintings, an excellent collection of prints.

On the main floor Mary has her studio, with three presses – makes me want to make prints again! (Maybe I will …).

Oh, and three fat pheasants were roosting in a tree outside the house for the night. And there is a ski hill just down the road. And they have X country skiing and snowshoeing trails on their property.

The workshop was held in a decomissioned elementary school classroom that has been given over to the Dawson art group. Sandy showed us how to complete the trees we had begun last time.

I am sort of happy with mine – at a certain point in the process I just did my own thing instead of what I was supposed to do so I did not get the results that I anticipated. Below you can see it just after I added snow to the branches.

And here it is so far (slightly out of focus …):

However, I can continue to add layers if I want to, to achieve something more like what I was supposed to get. Or not – I haven’t decided yet. Part of the problem is that I did not put enough texture on my piece and I did not do some of the glazing layers correctly. My tree ended up being sort of a cartoon tree. But it is fun to be learning some new painting techniques after all these years.

And here it is more in focus:

Please take note of the weather forecast – going down to -32 but sunny for Ty’s week off …

See more photos here.

Winter in November

Already halfway through November and the time seems to have gotten away on me – I had hoped to do an update before this! Well, we both took at least a week to recover from the Buddy Holly play – so much fun but needed to rest and relax after that. Everyone I spoke to said the play was fantastic, the most successful production that Stage North has ever done, and the best thing in Fort St John ever, and that was nice to hear. Since then, I have gotten a part-time job working 2 mornings a week at a local social service agency a three minute drive from our place, as their social media and training assistant. I update their various web pages and keep track of training modules and other duties as assigned.

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One of those other duties was to help prepare the building for their annual Haunted House, in which the whole place is decorated to be scary and spooky. Along with a few others, I taped black garbage bags to the walls to create dark tunnels along the hallways. Various local companies sponsor some of the rooms and this year about 950 brave souls made their way through the display. Ty & I thought that we’d probably have quite a few kids come through our complex for Halloween so we stocked up on quite a few boxes of tiny chocolate bars. It was snowing that night and we did not get a single kid … so, of course we had to consume those little goodies ourselves!

The artist group that I’ve joined spends a few days a month in a studio out at Charlie Lake, about a half hour drive along the Alaska Highway into the country from our place. The last time I was out there, the beginning of November, quite a few folks were there painting and making prints.

Mary, from Dawson Creek, was introducing a couple of people into the joys of linocut, very successfully.

Others were working on their tree portraits, the results of a painting workshop on the use of veils and glazes and other “old master” painting techniques by Sandy.

Since the results of this way of working are very cool, another group in Dawson Creek decided to have Sandy repeat the workshop there and I was lucky enough to be able to take it, too. We have completed the first day of the two day workshop and will finish it in December. I am pretty excited about the possibilities! Although I was trained as a painter many moons ago, painting has always been a bit problematic for me. The most difficult thing about it is deciding when a painting is finished – I don’t have that problem with printmaking, photography, or film, for some reason.

Here’s what I’ve done so far – it is ready for the next layers of colour.

I’ve had some success with my short films lately: The Fire Ceremony is an official selection for the Leicester City Film Festival this November and a Semi-Finalist for the Los Angeles Cine Fest, while Requiem for the Birds is an Official Selection for the 14th International Short & Independent Film Festival in Dhaka, Bangladesh from Dec 3 – Dec 10, 2016. I’ve also been selected for a photography show at the Grant Berg Gallery in Grande Prairie in January so I am working on stuff for that.

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Eliza and I had a great snowy walk a week or so ago with her old lab Tensing in Beatton Park, also at Charlie Lake, where a group of local people have made 15 kilometers of biking, cross-country skiing, and snowshoe trails through the forest. Eliza knows these trails like the back of her hand but I got completely turned around and lost; I haven’t figured out the lay of the land here yet. In between the trees, in the shade, there was still quite a bit of snow and ice.

Ty has begun shift work and has completed his first 14 days of night shift pretty successfully – we set up one of the bedrooms as a “dark room” with blackout curtains so that he’d be able to sleep during the day and that seems to be working pretty well. The transition to days off was a bit rough but he seems to be figuring it out. Below is a picture of the “super moon” rising out beyond our complex.

I’m still going to yoga but not as much – working is cramping my style a bit! I also signed on to do a volunteer project with the BC Seniors Advocate. They are interviewing every resident in long term care in British Columbia with an eye to improving care services for seniors. Along with about 10 others, I attended an all-day training session and have done 2 three hour shifts at the local residential care facility so far. Some of it is pretty heartbreaking. Our senior cat Aran is adjusting well; he was skin and bones for a while with the trauma of the move but he has resumed eating and seems pretty comfortable now.

I forgot to mention last time that at the art auction we attended there were several door prizes that we bought tickets for and, unbelievably, I won the last and best door prize – a helicopter ride for 4 over the area which can taken anytime in the next year! We will wait until warmer sunnier weather to give that a whirl.

Take note of the temperature … minus 9 – 10 now. My new snow suit is getting a good workout! On our walk a couple of days ago, in the beautiful new, and cold, snow that had descended on the city overnight, we saw a large hawk at the top of a tree – magnificent!

At first I thought it was a bald eagle; it had a golden head and a dark feathered body. I was able to take a few pictures of it before it hopped away from tree-top to tree-top looking for its next meal. On that walk both Ty & I realised that certain parts of our bodies were not warm enough: at -9 Ty’s feet were freezing and so were my hands! So we headed to the Mall and he got some snow and rain boots good to -40, I got a pair of very nice mittens, and we both got snowshoes so hopefully we should be good to go for the winter! We shall see …

Please take note of the snow on the bench here … about 6 – 8 inches, I figure. On our walk through the Fish Creek Urban Forest yesterday, Ty regaled me with tales of glorious woodsmanship, how to avoid getting caught in the bite and crushed by a falling tree, how to sidestep down the hill so as not to tumble on the ice, how to go around the base of a tree without grabbing hold of it and causing it to topple on top of me, etc. All good to know!

We sidestepped down a long narrow trail through a slide area of fallen trees to the river,

then up again to the flats, only to see at the top a sign declaring that trail closed …however,  there was no sign to be seen at the other end where we had entered, which I thought a bit odd. The forest was beautiful with its variety of trees – spruce, aspen, willow – and meandering stream not quite yet fully frozen.  The landscape is beautiful – it reminds me of my childhood in North Vancouver when we got snow every winter. Although it’s -9, it does not feel as cold as Vancouver at 5 above – it’s a dry cold rather than a heavy, wet, piercing cold.

Last night, with new friends Sylvia, Danielle, Tina, and Patrick, we piled into Good Old Daze, an ice cream parlour-restaurant-live-music-venue, to catch the return of Deere John, a local country music band, featuring Jim, our fearless media and microphone leader on the Buddy Holly show, rockin’ out on the keyboard. Good Times! (And a wee bit chilly for this new-to-the-north-newbie!).

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Here’s a couple of short videos of their tunes:

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https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipOyLyS87QuvHExLdVZfMoqTBfnCCFWvVc_Ydqo_pI23WBVcUuXECMSZ3_rIIhit4g/photo/AF1QipPwqdVw7J4Pi_m4X8Zs-145VVEDzxNp1dNFT_Sv?key=Q2FLQkNodkpFMjMyWnhvVFVoWENSNFFOZ0p3aUl3

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See more pics here.

Requiem for the Birds an Official Selection at the 14th International Short & Independent Film Festival, Dhaka, Bangladesh 2016

My short film Requiem for the Birds has been selected for screening at the 14th International Short & Independent Film Festival in Dhaka, Bangladesh from Dec 3 – Dec 10, 2016. A biennale film event, this festival has taken place since 1988 and is one of the oldest festivals of short film organized independently in South Asia. The Bangladesh Short Film Forum, the pioneer organization of independent Bangladeshi filmmakers, organizes the festival with a vision to promote the culture of independent and alternative cinema across the region. For more info about the festival, click here.

Soundtrack: Ars Sonor, When All is Said & Done and World Without and Steve Combs, Rest. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommerical-ShareAlike 3.0 International License.

Awash a Semi-Finalist at El Ojo Cojo International Film Fest in Madrid

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My film Awash has been selected as a Semi-Finalist at El Ojo Cojo International Film Fest in Madrid from Nov 4 – 12, 2016. El Ojo Cojo International Film Festival showcases fiction, documentaries and animation shorts and full-length films, in order to promote intercultural dialogue, featuring quality films that are not usually in the Spanish commercial market, and “raising awareness of the various facets of reality, trying not to fall into clichés.”

Soundtrack Hydroscope by Gallery Six, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial- Share Alike 4.0 International License. Remixed Lisa MacLean.

The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis Semi-Finalist at the Best Short Fest

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My film The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis has been selected as a Semi-Finalist at the Best Short Fest in Lanark County, Ontario.

BEST SHORT FEST is proud to bring the world’s best short films to the big screen at the historic community theatre in Lanark County, Ontario – less than an hour from Ottawa, and the United States (New York state), and 3.5 hours drive from Toronto.

After over 30 years as a live performance venue, since 2003 the theatre has regularly screened the best international films in partnership with the Film Circuit, a division of the Toronto International Film Festival Group, and BEST SHORT FEST continues this tradition, showcasing the talents of independent filmmakers from far and wide.

See the trailer here.

Awash at the TrixXxieFest Film Festival

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I’m happy to have my short film Awash presented at the 2016 TrixXxieFest Film Festival in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada. Soundtrack Hydroscope by Gallery Six, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial- Share Alike 4.0 International License. Remixed Lisa MacLean.

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Awash is part of a series entitled Urban Pastoral focusing on Vancouver’s seaside landscapes. In this work my interest is in the ways pastoral green spaces such as parks, gardens, nature walks, forest preserves, and others reconnect humans with nature and how such spaces might change with global climate change, high waters, and heat. A constellation of forces, including economic pressures, rising sea levels, extreme weather, and shoreline erosion, is affecting coastal areas worldwide. In Vancouver, the consequences of these changes for our society are beginning to register in the collective consciousness with recent reports that our city is one of the top ten around the world threatened by high waters.

We begin along Vancouver’s foreshore beaches, where people play and relax. Gradually the waters rise and waves swamp the picnicking and play areas; the inundation begins and fires flare. Alien creatures appear in our waters. The video ends with us swimming with the fishes through a tropical kelp forest.

The video’s unnatural coloration and technological processes (such as infrared photography) suggest our mutating relationship with nature and its consequences. Images of natural beauty console us that everything we love about our everyday environment is not being lost, while the slight psychic dislocation caused by the technological interventions – curious colour palette and image inversions – hints at decay and dissolution.

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TrixXxieFest is a pop-up Festival featuring short films, videos and performances to inspire, challenge and amuse – powerful voices from around the world and here at home. This year’s festival is happening from Friday June 24th and Saturday June 25th, 2016 at The Cox and Palmer Second Space at the LSPU Hall in downtown St. John’s, Newfoundland. The weekend will be a jam-packed two days of live performances, installations, screenings, parties and a punk rock show. This year’s event features an International program of film and video shorts highlighting experimental video, film-making, animation, and short documentary.

See the schedule here.

Read more about the festival here.

7th NYC Independent Film Festival 2016 here we come!

The raison d’etre for our being in New York, the 7th NYC Independent Film Festival, was held from April 27 – May 1, 2016, with my film, The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis, being screened twice in the Art/Experimental category during the run. We were very excited about being there for the show and headed out on foot on Thursday evening for the premiere.

The venue, the Producer’s Club on 44th Street, looked as though it was only a few short blocks away on our map, so we decided that we’d eat dinner somewhere near it before the show. Carmine’s, an Italian place we’d chosen, was absolutely packed, so, after waiting for a bit, we decided to bail and find another, less-crowded place to eat, as the clock was ticking away. The Midtown theater district has a million places to eat and all of them are packed but we were able to secure a table at Mama Mia on the corner of 9th Avenue, just down from the Producer’s Club – huzzah!

We weren’t able to linger over a leisurely dinner, though, if we wanted to make the premiere, so it was dine and dash to the venue, right across the street from the eternally playing Phantom of the Opera, for which people were lined up down the block day and night.

Once inside, Ty and I received our official participant tags and tickets for free drinks.

It was fun meeting some of the other filmmakers before the show, including Peter Meng from New Jersey, director of Take the High Line,

and Dominik Pagacz from Montreal, director of Baleful Sloth.

Here are a few shots of my film from the Thursday night screening.

See more pics here. I was really pleased and proud to have had my film selected for the Festival and it was so great to be able to sit in the audience and watch the screening – good times!

NYC Independent Film Festival 2016 Program excerpt

Taking a Small Bite Out of the Big Apple

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New York City in the Spring! Ty and I were very excited to be going to the Big Apple for the screening of my film The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis at the NYC Independent Film festival. Since the rates for hotel rooms in Midtown Manhattan are outrageous, we decided to stay at the same place I’d stayed when I was last in New York exactly 30 years ago, the Vanderbilt YMCA on 47th St.

Ty and I got a room on the “deluxe” floor, a prison-cell-sized closet with bunk beds for $160. a night. In addition to the bunk beds, the room had a small desk, one chair, and a tiny fridge (possibly that’s what made it deluxe …). On our floor there were about 10 shared bedrooms with shower; these were newly-renovated and very clean.

I had the top bunk, naturally, since if Ty had fallen through, he would have crushed me in my sleep. Climbing the ladder to get up every night was not for the faint-hearted and helped me with my weight-bearing exercise program.

After arriving at about 8 pm we threw down our bags and headed out on the mid-town, passing the blue-lit Helmsley Building,

stopping first at Blackwell’s Pub for a hot and tasty dinner of chicken curry and calamari. There are innumerable Irish pubs in Midtown and this is just one of them.

Our destination  was Times Square, just down a few very long colourfully-lit blocks …

Here I am blinded by the light of a gazillion LED advertising screens on every building surface, pumping out images and text all night every night.

Along with boat-loads of tourists, the square is also home to a vast cast of cartoon characters wandering around with whom one can have one’s picture taken, presumably for a tip.

I look a bit bemused because I was exhausted, having just gotten home from Mexico only to be whisked off again to NYC within 20 hours without much in the way of sleep.

Time Square was also the destination for scores of bicycle chariot peddlers; I was interested in taking a ride until I saw the price, an exorbitant $5.99 to $7.99 a MINUTE.

We took a minute to admire these beauties.

On the way back to the ranch, we passed the Radio City Music Hall.

Such was our first evening in NYC. Next morning we were up and out the door towards Grand Central Station to check out the scene there. It was full of people taking pictures of themselves in its vast golden space.

Next stop on the Midtown tour was St Patrick’s Cathedral, currently being worked on by construction crews. There is construction everywhere in Midtown and traffic jams day and night.

The church is beautiful and spotless inside, a testament to the wealth of its parishioners.

Right across Fifth Avenue is the Rockefeller Center Atlas sculpture, eternally holding up the world.

I was pretty impressed with how clean in general the streets are; I don’t remember the city being this clean in the 80s. Beautiful gilt statues and reliefs adorn many of the building facades.

Our destination was the Metropolitan Museum and we walked there through Central Park, stopping for a moment to watch the horses, puppet master, and animal life.

I was interested in seeing the Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun and Pergamum shows currently on display here. We strolled through the fantastic Greek and Roman sculpture rooms on our way.

I love seeing the highly decorated rooms of the wealthy, such as this one. Unfortunately, with the dim lighting, it’s difficult to take a picture that’s in focus.

It was also interesting to see the art students at working copying from the masters. Apparently these folks get special permission to do this and are given all the supplies, including the paint and easels, from the Museum.

The Pergamum show, featuring works from the site on the west coast of what is now Turkey, formerly Asia Minor, includes some important sculpture which I had only seen in reproduction before.

The Met has a small selection of contemporary art on display here, including this wall piece by Kiki Smith which I loved.

And this Anselm Kiefer painting and Thomas Hart Benton mural.

Ty had had the foresight to download a NYC subway map to my smartphone, and we made great use of it navigating around the city, a good thing because all the walking was making our feet very, very tired. It was nice to be able to just hop on a train and be whisked back to the room (well, at least back to within four blocks of it, rather than 20 or so!).

See more pics here.

Clay Cooking in the Art Kitchen, Puerto Vallarta

The gang of six on the way to Art Vallarta.

Diego, Frida, and her monkey welcomed us to the Mexican-Morrocan cooking class at Art Vallarta last Wednesday evening. Hosted by the wonderful Nathalie, the class is held in the Art Kitchen penthouse of the San Franciscan condo complex in Old Town Puerto Vallarta, in the air above Art Vallarta.

The artist-painted chair backs are a new addition to the terrace dining table this year and they are gorgeous, as are the beautiful handmade textile place-mats.

Nathalie, dressed in colourful Frida-inspired clothing and apron, greeted us with refreshing blended drinks of tequila, cilantro, and pineapple juice (so much for my swearing off tequila …).

The first order of business was removing the pistils from a bowl of zucchini flowers to be used in a crepe dish.

Next, Janet was deputised to wash the banana leaves for a clay-cooked fish dish, while Maggie stoked the fire in the chimenea, in which the fish was to be cooked.

In addition to the raw clay platters Nathalie had pre-prepared, looking like enormous peanut butter cookies, the dish required a sauce of passion plant seeds from her enormous flowers, lots of cilantro, red onion, and cream.

This is the passion plant flower; it is at least four times as big as the ones I grow on my deck.

After patting out the clay and covering it with a banana leaf, we added a chunk of red snapper, drenched it with sauce, sealed it up in a banana leaf, and wrapped the entire package in clay, being sure that the clay had no holes.

Nathalie was pleased with our creations.

While we made the clay fish pockets, Brook whipped up the batter for the crepes in a large clay dish.

Once the chimenea was hot enough, Nathalie inserted the clay fish pockets deep into its belly, finding room for all nine pieces.

For the main dish, Nathalie had marinated chicken thighs and placed them in the bottom of one of Froylan’s whimsical clay tagines.

Building up the dish into a pyramid of food, we added prunes, red onion, herika sauce,

carrots, zucchini, garbanzo beans, potatoes, lots and lots of cilantro,

pomegranate seeds,

and covered the whole enormous pile with cabbage leaves at the end. The tagine is simply placed on a stove top element and left to cook for an hour or so; since the food that requires the most time to cook is placed on the bottom and that which requires the least at the top, all of it is ready to go at the same time.

The zucchini flowers were rolled into the crepes with a mild white cheese and covered in a roasted tomato sauce.

It was a bit tricky getting all of the clay pockets out of the chimenea’s belly.

Unfortunately, two of the pockets exploded while cooking but mine survived intact.

Once seated at the dining table, we each took turns whacking the clay with wooden mallets to reveal the fish inside.

My favourite dishes were the spicy cold avocado soup and the crepe.

This is what the crepe, when cooked, looked like. I really love the unusual ingredients and unique ways in which Nathalie’s recipes are prepared and cooked – her class is highly recommended!

And here’s the tagine dish. Thanks to Nathalie for a wonderful cooking class and great evening on her terrace!

See more pics here. For more info on the Art Kitchen, go here.

 

Plein Air at Los Muertos

Four of the six amigas decided to do plein air painting on the beach at Los Muertos today. Instead of Adrian Rojas, the usual teacher who is out of town, we had Quetzal Cocoatl instead, who arrived at Art Vallarta with a big smile.

After paying our dues and buying canvases, we rolled down the hill will all our supplies to set up shop under the palapas at the Tropicana hotel.

We were each given a portable easel, selection of acrylic paints and brushes, and the guidance of Quetzal for the morning. It took a few moments to decide where to set up our easels for the most optimum subject matter. I decided to face north towards the pier.

Quetzal sketched out a beach scene of umbrellas and chairs for Barb to paint, while Janet, Maggie and I opted for landscapes, and Kathy decided to do a portrait of Maggie.

A group of French Canadian men from Montreal came by to see what we were up to and spent quite a bit of time admiring our work. As you can see here, I began by sketching out the motif in yellow ochre and started to block in non-naturalistic colours.

Maggie’s first landscape started off well with a beautiful cloudy sky the colour of her shirt.

My piece progressed more or less slowly, since I got a little bored with the subject long before it was actually done.

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Barb’s piece came along nicely, and Quetzal embarked on a portrait of Maggie painting.

Kathy blocked in the background colours around Maggie’s figure.

Janet decided to go for a more naturalistic approach, using blues and greys for her beachscape.

After completing the landscape of Conchas Chinas, Maggie began a new figurative piece we called “The Pink Man”, a portrait of the seated man in front of her.

Everyone continued to work away assiduously on their respective paintings, adding colour and detail.

Below is the actual pink man, a very suntanned French Canadian from Montreal.

I was beginning to like my painting more as I added more pinks, purple, and lilacs to the foreground.

Somehow, the pink man became aware that he was the subject of a portrait image and he, along with his posse, strolled over to check it out.

Happily, the pink man decided that he had to have the canvas as a souvenir of his vacation and a deal was made; he walked off with a MM original, to the delight of all.

Whereapon, Maggie decided to buy the portrait that Quetzal had painted of her, once again to the delight of all.

In these photos, my piece looks a bit washed out – it’s more vibrant in the flesh, so to speak.

All in all, a most successful day of art-making – huzzah! See more photos here. See some of Quetzal’s work here.