Greetings from the North!

The view flying into Fort St John. Wow, it’s been a fast and furious month since I’ve landed in FSJ with Aran the cat in his carrier. The beast turned out to be a pretty good traveller, once he got over the shock of going through security at Vancouver airport.

After a pretty good dose of culture shock for the first few weeks, I am starting to settle in up here. I have decided to focus on the things I like every day rather than feel sad about what I’ve left behind. First up on that list is the people that I have met here, a wonderful bunch of very friendly and active folks from many different facets of the community, artists, theatre folks, yoginis, environmental people …

One of the very first things we did upon my arrival was to walk around the neighbourhood and check out the prospects. There are two sweet little “metaphysical” stores, Earthly Treasures and The Wisdom Tree, selling crystals and other goodies for spiritual contemplation.

The Arts Post is a nice studio space with a very active group of potters.

Possibly I might try to get back into ceramics here – the studio is well set up.

I have also connected with the Flying Colours Art Association, a wonderful and welcoming group of artists who have workshops, exhibitions, and a great studio to work in every second week. I hope to get into the studio and do some painting by the end of September; at the moment I’m working on a new series of infrared photographic images of the northern landscape. Here’s an example:

peace-river

On the main drag through town is the Blacksmith Yoga Community studio, in the green building in the picture below. It’s a vinyasa studio, a style of yoga that I used to do with Kathryn Turnbull at the Roundhouse in Vancouver, but more demanding than what I’m used to. The first few sessions left me with pretty stiff muscles!

We are living in a new area at the western edge of the city, where townhomes and condo buildings have been constructed – at the moment we are in the middle of a construction site with trucks and machines coming and going. The number and size of the pickup trucks around here is amazing; even though our new car is the biggest I’ve ever had, it seems tiny in comparison. It still feels very decadent to me to just be able to hop in the car and go wherever I want after not having had a car for five years. (Thank you so much to all the friends who have so kindly given us lifts places over those years!)

Our unit is the second from the end in the left-hand building pictured below.

We checked out the Fall Fair north of the city last month, getting a feel for the country life.

A really active group here is the Spinners, Weavers, and Quilters and they had a big display of their work in one of the buildings.

We watched the cattle show, in which various groups of people brought in their beasts and paraded them around the ring for the judge’s assessment, some more skilfully than others.

We also saw some of the sheepdog show, with various doggies shepherding sheep into pens.

Horse-riding is also a big thing in these parts.

I had ridden past the Fort Bowling building on my bike when heading to the yoga studio but was unsure if it was actually in business or not. But, yes, it is definitely in business and we gave it a whirl. My arm was not really up to it, though – will have to strengthen the muscles to up my game.

It was fun, except for the burning pain in my forearm! Check out my style – I actually got a few strikes (a few less than Ty, though …)

On the northern edge of town is an urban forest called Fish Creek, a nice place to walk on a sunny day. I was a bit nervous about the prospect of bears, though; however, we did not see any evidence of them that day.

One of things that I do love here is the aspen trees; they are everywhere up here. We noticed right away that the trees are much, much smaller here.

Very close to the city is Beatton Park and Charlie Lake, a lovely picnic area.

There are paved separated bike paths along the main street and around the perimeter of the city, a very nice feature.

Since it is mostly flat, the city is pretty easy to get around on bikes. And not very much traffic, either, compared to what we’re used to.

On Ty’s week off, we took a road trip to Grande Prairie, Alberta, to get snow tires and see a bit of the countryside. The journey takes about two and a half hours each way, travelling south through Dawson Creek and Beaverlodge. We stopped and checked out the Philip J Curry Dinosaur museum in Wembley, Alta on the way.

This area is full of fossils, some of which are on display here.

Ty is not trying to steal a dinosaur bone; this pit is for visitors to practice being paleontologists by dusting the dirt off bones.

On the way back, we stopped in at the Dawson Creek Art Gallery, located in a decommissioned grain silo.

One of the really fun things that we’re doing is getting involved with Stage North, the local theatre company. They are producing the Buddy Holly Story, on stage for two weeks the end of October. Ty and I are helping out with projections and as stage hands. Ty is designing a projection system for videos that will play during the performance.

I’ve been to one rehearsal so far and thought it was great. Here are a couple of video clips of three of the songs they’re working on.

https://goo.gl/photos/FbeELESUrMGCbhnf8

https://goo.gl/photos/3yWnEo6vXowpxWgG6

Good times!

Awash a Semi-Finalist at El Ojo Cojo International Film Fest in Madrid

Awash with landscape v1 (2).Movie_Snapshot

My film Awash has been selected as a Semi-Finalist at El Ojo Cojo International Film Fest in Madrid from Nov 4 – 12, 2016. El Ojo Cojo International Film Festival showcases fiction, documentaries and animation shorts and full-length films, in order to promote intercultural dialogue, featuring quality films that are not usually in the Spanish commercial market, and “raising awareness of the various facets of reality, trying not to fall into clichés.”

Soundtrack Hydroscope by Gallery Six, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial- Share Alike 4.0 International License. Remixed Lisa MacLean.

The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis Semi-Finalist at the Best Short Fest

SEMI-FINALIST-BESTSHORTFEST-2016

My film The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis has been selected as a Semi-Finalist at the Best Short Fest in Lanark County, Ontario.

BEST SHORT FEST is proud to bring the world’s best short films to the big screen at the historic community theatre in Lanark County, Ontario – less than an hour from Ottawa, and the United States (New York state), and 3.5 hours drive from Toronto.

After over 30 years as a live performance venue, since 2003 the theatre has regularly screened the best international films in partnership with the Film Circuit, a division of the Toronto International Film Festival Group, and BEST SHORT FEST continues this tradition, showcasing the talents of independent filmmakers from far and wide.

See the trailer here.

Awash at the TrixXxieFest Film Festival

LaurelsTrixXxiefest

I’m happy to have my short film Awash presented at the 2016 TrixXxieFest Film Festival in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada. Soundtrack Hydroscope by Gallery Six, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial- Share Alike 4.0 International License. Remixed Lisa MacLean.

Awash with landscape v1 (3).Movie_Snapshot

Awash with landscape v1 (4).Movie_Snapshot

Awash is part of a series entitled Urban Pastoral focusing on Vancouver’s seaside landscapes. In this work my interest is in the ways pastoral green spaces such as parks, gardens, nature walks, forest preserves, and others reconnect humans with nature and how such spaces might change with global climate change, high waters, and heat. A constellation of forces, including economic pressures, rising sea levels, extreme weather, and shoreline erosion, is affecting coastal areas worldwide. In Vancouver, the consequences of these changes for our society are beginning to register in the collective consciousness with recent reports that our city is one of the top ten around the world threatened by high waters.

We begin along Vancouver’s foreshore beaches, where people play and relax. Gradually the waters rise and waves swamp the picnicking and play areas; the inundation begins and fires flare. Alien creatures appear in our waters. The video ends with us swimming with the fishes through a tropical kelp forest.

The video’s unnatural coloration and technological processes (such as infrared photography) suggest our mutating relationship with nature and its consequences. Images of natural beauty console us that everything we love about our everyday environment is not being lost, while the slight psychic dislocation caused by the technological interventions – curious colour palette and image inversions – hints at decay and dissolution.

Awash with landscape v1.Movie_Snapshot

Awash with landscape v1 (2).Movie_Snapshot

TrixXxieFest is a pop-up Festival featuring short films, videos and performances to inspire, challenge and amuse – powerful voices from around the world and here at home. This year’s festival is happening from Friday June 24th and Saturday June 25th, 2016 at The Cox and Palmer Second Space at the LSPU Hall in downtown St. John’s, Newfoundland. The weekend will be a jam-packed two days of live performances, installations, screenings, parties and a punk rock show. This year’s event features an International program of film and video shorts highlighting experimental video, film-making, animation, and short documentary.

See the schedule here.

Read more about the festival here.

Arrivederci New York – Hasta Luego!

Saturday dawned blue sky and sun so another walk through Central Park was in order to get to our destination of the American Museum of Natural History on the west side of the park.

Unlike the previous day, when there had been few takers for the horse rides, this sunny day attracted a lot of patrons for both the horses and the bike chariots.

We saw some beautiful blue birds being fed, and a fellow stroking a pigeon.

Strangely, to us, most of the green space is fenced off here. Some areas have signs advertising the space for “passive recreation” only. There are also a number of interestingly-designed children’s playgrounds fenced off from the rest of the park.

It was a pleasant walk up to 77th St and we saw a grand parade of walkers for a Children’s Cancer Cure procession wind their way along the road, along with the plumed horses, rocket racer cyclists, and bike chariots.

We also caught a few minutes of a couple of different Little League games, one with boys and the other with girls, all playing at more or less the same level.

There are quite a few dining and drinking pavilions in the park; in the sun, they look very pleasant.

Our route took us across the park and up the West Side to the Museum, whose lobby contains a couple of gigantic dinosaur skeletons. The lobby was packed with families and kids, all excited about the visit.

Our favourite rooms on this visit were the gem and mineral repositories, with their collections of fantastic crystals and meteorites.

We also saw a magnificent multi-coloured ammonite in one of the museum’s lobbies.

Museums are hot, hard work and we were dying for a beer on a sunny patio but that was not the easiest thing to find in this neck of the woods. We walked over to Broadway and finally found one patio that would sell us a beer at a Mediterranean food joint.

On the way back we paused briefly to people watch at Columbus Circle, crowded with both locals and tourists, all clusters around the many food trucks and trailers. Lots of halal meals here.

For our final evening in the big city we decided to have dinner Midtown and walk around the streets in the area.

Times Square was hopping as usual as we tried to find a place to eat.

We finally found a seat at Serafini’s on 49th and enjoyed some really great Italian food.

We capped off the evening by exploring Rockefeller Center, including the fantastic murals on the interior walls and ceilings, the art deco wall reliefs, the gardens, and the dry ice arena angel.

We found out that Sunday, our departure day, the Five Boro Bike Ride was taking over the streets of Manhattan so we were up and out of the Y early to make sure that we would not get caught in some kind of transit nightmare. Backtracking our trail on the subway and bus was pretty straightforward and we had no difficulty in arriving at La Guardia in plenty of time for our flight.

So long New York – It was a great trip! Who knows if we will see you again. Cheers!

Morgan Library, Whitney Museum and Broadway Theater

One of the great things I remembered from my last, long ago visit to New York City, was the JP Morgan Library, a repository of rare books, manuscripts, and art which we decided to check out on our second day in the city.

Since I had been here last, the Library has gained a fantastic new addition to its premises, greatly expanding the exhibition space.

I find smaller venues like this one much easier to take than the vast expanse of, say, the Met; the viewing experience is more manageable.

The entrance to the Library proper reminds me of a Renaissance villa or chapel with its beautiful harmonious architecture and marble cladding.

In one of the rooms is a collection of Mesopotamian cylinder seals and Egyptian cuneiform and hieroglyphs; the seals are the earliest form of printmaking, used to mark ownership or affirm identity.

In another section of the library is the Morgan’s collection of rare books, including three copies of the first printed book, the Gutenberg Bible, below.

And several rare Books of Hours are also on display. The Book of Hours is designed for prayer and contemplation, with images and text used for each specific hour of the canonical day.

Several of the rooms also have priceless paintings, such as this Madonna and Child tondo by Botticelli.

In addition to the permanent collection, the Library also hosts temporary exhibitions; on display now are books by Andy Warhol

and an exhibition of photographs entitled Sight Reading, with both historical and contemporary photos of the natural world.

We then made our way by subway down to Greenwich Village to check out the new Whitney Museum, riverside on Gansevoort. It was a bit tricky to find, since we’d inadvertently gone too far south on the train and had to backtrack through a somewhat confusing maze of streets. Ty decided he was not up for this particular viewing experience, so he staked out a resting spot outside on one of the metal chairs.

The museum is a large cement and metal structure, with outside viewing platforms and sculpture displays on the top three floors. Since the lineup for the elevators was huge, I elected to make my way to the top 8th floor via the staircases.

From the top floors, there is a commanding view out over the river and city below, including the High Line, a mile long park stretched along a disused rail line just below the museum.

Among the exhibitions was an interesting multi-media show about the post 9-11 state by Laura Poitras, including an installation in a darkened room in which visitors lay on a large bed-like couch to view the video screening on the room’s ceiling.

Several floors were taken up with a portrait exhibition drawn from the Museum’s permanent collection.

In one of the rooms, I spotted a fellow that we’d seen at the Met the other day with an unusual tie … he told me that it was part of a limited collection.

After rejoining Ty on the ground, we headed to a packed Bubby’s, right across the street, for some fried chicken.

After seeing the film the night before, we had to check out the High Line and walked part way along its length before strolling to a nearby subway station for the ride back.

Miles of walking required an hour of feets-up rest before we hit the road again for my first Broadway show at the Samuel J Friedman Theater for the just-opened critically acclaimed The Father, starring Frank Langella and Kathryn Erbe, her of Law and Order fame.

We elected to have a drink across the street at the Glass House Tavern, a standing-room only bar in which, when we appeared at the back of the room, a waiter quickly brought out and assembled a table for us to sit at – that’s service! In general, I found the service everywhere we went to be excellent here.

We arrived at the theater early, taking our seats near the front. The show was great, but grim, an account of the descent into dementia of the titular character played by Langella. The audience, not surprisingly considering both the subject matter of the play and the cost of the tickets, was old, very old, and some were very upset, crying as they left the theater.

Thus ended another wonderful day in the city.

See more pics here.

7th NYC Independent Film Festival 2016 here we come!

The raison d’etre for our being in New York, the 7th NYC Independent Film Festival, was held from April 27 – May 1, 2016, with my film, The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis, being screened twice in the Art/Experimental category during the run. We were very excited about being there for the show and headed out on foot on Thursday evening for the premiere.

The venue, the Producer’s Club on 44th Street, looked as though it was only a few short blocks away on our map, so we decided that we’d eat dinner somewhere near it before the show. Carmine’s, an Italian place we’d chosen, was absolutely packed, so, after waiting for a bit, we decided to bail and find another, less-crowded place to eat, as the clock was ticking away. The Midtown theater district has a million places to eat and all of them are packed but we were able to secure a table at Mama Mia on the corner of 9th Avenue, just down from the Producer’s Club – huzzah!

We weren’t able to linger over a leisurely dinner, though, if we wanted to make the premiere, so it was dine and dash to the venue, right across the street from the eternally playing Phantom of the Opera, for which people were lined up down the block day and night.

Once inside, Ty and I received our official participant tags and tickets for free drinks.

It was fun meeting some of the other filmmakers before the show, including Peter Meng from New Jersey, director of Take the High Line,

and Dominik Pagacz from Montreal, director of Baleful Sloth.

Here are a few shots of my film from the Thursday night screening.

See more pics here. I was really pleased and proud to have had my film selected for the Festival and it was so great to be able to sit in the audience and watch the screening – good times!

NYC Independent Film Festival 2016 Program excerpt

Taking a Small Bite Out of the Big Apple

laurel_Official_selection

New York City in the Spring! Ty and I were very excited to be going to the Big Apple for the screening of my film The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis at the NYC Independent Film festival. Since the rates for hotel rooms in Midtown Manhattan are outrageous, we decided to stay at the same place I’d stayed when I was last in New York exactly 30 years ago, the Vanderbilt YMCA on 47th St.

Ty and I got a room on the “deluxe” floor, a prison-cell-sized closet with bunk beds for $160. a night. In addition to the bunk beds, the room had a small desk, one chair, and a tiny fridge (possibly that’s what made it deluxe …). On our floor there were about 10 shared bedrooms with shower; these were newly-renovated and very clean.

I had the top bunk, naturally, since if Ty had fallen through, he would have crushed me in my sleep. Climbing the ladder to get up every night was not for the faint-hearted and helped me with my weight-bearing exercise program.

After arriving at about 8 pm we threw down our bags and headed out on the mid-town, passing the blue-lit Helmsley Building,

stopping first at Blackwell’s Pub for a hot and tasty dinner of chicken curry and calamari. There are innumerable Irish pubs in Midtown and this is just one of them.

Our destination  was Times Square, just down a few very long colourfully-lit blocks …

Here I am blinded by the light of a gazillion LED advertising screens on every building surface, pumping out images and text all night every night.

Along with boat-loads of tourists, the square is also home to a vast cast of cartoon characters wandering around with whom one can have one’s picture taken, presumably for a tip.

I look a bit bemused because I was exhausted, having just gotten home from Mexico only to be whisked off again to NYC within 20 hours without much in the way of sleep.

Time Square was also the destination for scores of bicycle chariot peddlers; I was interested in taking a ride until I saw the price, an exorbitant $5.99 to $7.99 a MINUTE.

We took a minute to admire these beauties.

On the way back to the ranch, we passed the Radio City Music Hall.

Such was our first evening in NYC. Next morning we were up and out the door towards Grand Central Station to check out the scene there. It was full of people taking pictures of themselves in its vast golden space.

Next stop on the Midtown tour was St Patrick’s Cathedral, currently being worked on by construction crews. There is construction everywhere in Midtown and traffic jams day and night.

The church is beautiful and spotless inside, a testament to the wealth of its parishioners.

Right across Fifth Avenue is the Rockefeller Center Atlas sculpture, eternally holding up the world.

I was pretty impressed with how clean in general the streets are; I don’t remember the city being this clean in the 80s. Beautiful gilt statues and reliefs adorn many of the building facades.

Our destination was the Metropolitan Museum and we walked there through Central Park, stopping for a moment to watch the horses, puppet master, and animal life.

I was interested in seeing the Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun and Pergamum shows currently on display here. We strolled through the fantastic Greek and Roman sculpture rooms on our way.

I love seeing the highly decorated rooms of the wealthy, such as this one. Unfortunately, with the dim lighting, it’s difficult to take a picture that’s in focus.

It was also interesting to see the art students at working copying from the masters. Apparently these folks get special permission to do this and are given all the supplies, including the paint and easels, from the Museum.

The Pergamum show, featuring works from the site on the west coast of what is now Turkey, formerly Asia Minor, includes some important sculpture which I had only seen in reproduction before.

The Met has a small selection of contemporary art on display here, including this wall piece by Kiki Smith which I loved.

And this Anselm Kiefer painting and Thomas Hart Benton mural.

Ty had had the foresight to download a NYC subway map to my smartphone, and we made great use of it navigating around the city, a good thing because all the walking was making our feet very, very tired. It was nice to be able to just hop on a train and be whisked back to the room (well, at least back to within four blocks of it, rather than 20 or so!).

See more pics here.

Random PV Moments

The upstairs amigas getting ready for the day.

An old town bug.

At the Three Hens and a Rooster Saturday Artists’ Market.

This small market is held in what was formerly a restaurant whose proprietors apparently had to get out of town fast.

Katrina guarding a selection of books.

Barb teaching the coffee shop man some moves.

Another larger Farmers’ Market in Old Town at Lazaro Cardenas Park is also on Saturdays; these two young female mariachis serenaded us with song and violins.

Right across the street is Page in the Sun, one of my favourite coffee places in old town.

There’s a beautiful glass and ceramic mosaic on the wall of the elementary school here.

Another day, another early morning coffee on the Loma Linda deck. Maggie blows out her 21st birthday candle.

Maggie watercolourised Barb and I.

The artist at work – Maggie painted lots of acrylic on canvas works on the deck here.

Another day, another coffee at Page in the Sun, here with Penticton artist and plein air master Angie McIntosh, who has a condo and studio here.

We saw lots of local women getting ready for some kind of performance at Los Arcos amphitheatre.

Janet had her photo taken with some Aztec dancers on the malecon.

Janet and Kathy took some classes with Douglas Simonson at Art Vallarta called Harnessing the Power of Painting and were very impressed with his teaching methods. Below is one of the exercises they did, learning how to mix and blend colours by painting what look like spheres.

See you next time, Puerto Vallarta!

Exploring Bucerias and Los Muertos Beach

Bucerias! Never having visited this beach town before, Barb, Janet, and I made the treck out on a Saturday, first grabbing a cab to the Walmart bus stop and then the ATM green bus along the highway in the direction of Sayulita. The bus, whose driver had affixed an enormous metal crucifix to his windshield, deposited us at the Centro intersection and we rolled down towards the water, stopping first at the church, whose cement fence was topped by interesting cement animals.

Inside the church scores of local kids were running around, playing games, eating lunch, and just generally having a good time. It was nice to see the space being so well used, courtesy of the priest who allows them to use the nave because they have no other public place to congregate.

One of the interior statues features Christ with a large wooden flame in the middle of his head.

The plaza in which the church is located is lovely and green and only a block from the water.

At the bottom of the lamp stands are a variety of shells embedded in concrete, attesting to the fact that one used to be able to find such shells locally, even though I’ve never seen anything larger than a tiny clam shell in the years I’ve been coming here.

The beach is quite nice, long and sandy, although narrow and steeply dropping off, as all the beaches here seem to be now. We decided to set up shop at El Gordo seafood restaurant, drawn by the welcoming Canadian flag.

Even though it was a Saturday there were not very many people at the beach; this meant that the parade of vendors, mostly jewelry salespeople, paid us more attention that ideally I would have wanted.

A small crowd of kids flocked around us, trying to tempt us with rubber toy animals. They expressed interest in the pins attached to my hat so I gave one to each of the four of them. The boy below, a pretty shrewd operator, wanted the small pin that had been my Dad’s, the only one that I was unwilling to part with.

Two cowboys with three small horses cantered by and tried to get us to go for a ride; Janet, a horsewoman, had a look at one of them, a lovely white boy, but decided against it.

After purchasing some fake silver rings from one of the vendors (I’m sure mine are fake but Janet’s seemed real – if I get a rash on my fingers after wearing them, I will know for sure), our day at the beach concluded with small shots of kahlua on the house.

For our final full day in PV, we had breakfast on the beach at La Palapa in very pleasant beachside seats. Unfortunately, my pancakes were cold; the huevos rancheros looked pretty good, though.

After settling ourselves at the Swell Beach Club for the day, we watched a high flyer show off on his flyboard, dipping and diving like a sea serpent.

Barb and Janet each took home Frida sarongs, while Maggie and Kathy purchased tablecloths and a woven rug.

So long, Puerto Vallarta! Thanks for another great time – hasta luego!