Fun in the Snow and the Theatre

We have been so busy with the Buddy Holly production that I’ve only been able to make it to Miep’s painting studio once in the last little while. I’m working on a mixed media painting inspired by the northern landscape; here’s a work-in-progress picture of it. The studio is on the outskirts of Fort St John, near Charlie Lake, in beautiful countryside – here’s a photo of the road along the way.

It has been cold, snowy and sometimes icy almost consistently since the end of September, very early for here according to locals.

The above photo was taken from the highway just outside Taylor, a small town about 20 or so kilometers from FSJ on the way to Dawson Creek. We passed through it on the way to Dawson to buy me a snow suit; while FSJ has a lot of outdoor clothing outfitters, they only cater to men. We could not find a woman’s snowsuit in the city.

The snowy landscape is beautiful when the sun comes out.

Here are a few photos from one of our regular walks on the northern edge of the city.

Our friend Marsha gave me the advice to “Look up!” at the big sky – it is great. No tall buildings to block out the expanse of blue and the rolling clouds.

Kathryn had asked us to make her a snowman, so I obliged by adding a head to this big body already made.

I saw hoar frost for the first time, too – stunning first thing in the morning on a sunny day.

These trees are just a few blocks down the road from our place.

Eliza, an artist friend up here and a keen walker and hiker, took me out for a snowy walk in the woods.

Beavers live here in the Fish Creek; you can see evidence of them everywhere in the forest here.

We came upon two old 1940s vehicles abandoned among the trees, driven up here when the Alaska Highway was built – not sure why they’ve been left here but it was very cool to come across them.

Ty and I went to the big annual fundraising art auction for the North Peace Gallery at the Pomeroy Hotel near our place. It was a masquerade affair, so everyone wore masks.

I had never been to a live auction before and the fellow calling had a bit of difficulty with some of the “art terms”; possibly he was more used to auctioning off cattle …

It was lots of fun; we bid on and purchased two artist handpainted masks, one of which Ty’s wearing here.

We have been working on the Buddy Holly story now for about two months and it opened this weekend to thunderous applause. But, wow, what an enormous amount of work about 50 people have put into getting this show together, all the way from building and painting the sets, transporting them in multiple vehicles to the theatre, dissassembling and reassembling the sets to get them in the door, and setting everything up again inside.

Below is Director Blair Scott and Music Director Mike O in action, directing Buddy and the Big Bopper in the Clear Lake concert scene.

Ty and I worked hours trying to get our screens and projections to work, encountering quite a few issues beyond our control, such as problematic computer ports and projector signals. Below Ty is setting the screen, rolling it up to the rafters and putting the quick release, a chopstick attached to mason cord run along the pipes and down through half a pop bottle to the computer, in place.

Here Ty is working booting one of the Buddy videos up.

Sound man Jim looks on from backstage at the Apollo theatre scene.

I was asked to be Jim’s assistant, helping him take on and off the various microphones needed for the musicians – a very complex set up that he looked after admirably, flying around the set plugging and unplugging cords and adjusting amps.

Here you see all three screens deployed and all three videos working – this was a major accomplishment.

Below is my two computer set-up, roped off with ribbons and “Do Not Touch Under Pain of Death and Destruction” sign. Our contribution to the play, a Buddy Around the World video that takes place on the big back screen in the first act, and three videos on three screens of Buddy, the Big Bopper, and Ritchie Valens, at the very end, after their death in a plane crash has been announced, was quite a complex undertaking and has caused me an enormous amount of stress to put together. At the appropriate moment, after the deaths of the three artists is announced, Ty and I each pull the rip cord to dislodge the chop stick and unfurl the side screens, then hit the play button on the videos. But, when it finally worked, it was a beautiful thing.

The show has played four days last week and will have its final four days this week.

Here are some photos taken at one of the performances by Show Case Photo, a local photographer.

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Here is a video I took from backstage at Saturday night’s performance, a fantastic show in which everything came together; the audience went wild with thunderous applause and a standing O for all these very talented folks.

When this play closes, I will sleep for a month! See more photos here.

Requiem for the Birds an Official Selection at the 14th International Short & Independent Film Festival, Dhaka, Bangladesh 2016

My short film Requiem for the Birds has been selected for screening at the 14th International Short & Independent Film Festival in Dhaka, Bangladesh from Dec 3 – Dec 10, 2016. A biennale film event, this festival has taken place since 1988 and is one of the oldest festivals of short film organized independently in South Asia. The Bangladesh Short Film Forum, the pioneer organization of independent Bangladeshi filmmakers, organizes the festival with a vision to promote the culture of independent and alternative cinema across the region. For more info about the festival, click here.

Soundtrack: Ars Sonor, When All is Said & Done and World Without and Steve Combs, Rest. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommerical-ShareAlike 3.0 International License.

From Fall to Winter overnight …

Well, it’s been a fast and furious couple of weeks up here in the north country; we’ve gone from late summer to mid-winter between the middle of September and the beginning of October. The wind is strong in this part of the world, and if it’s blowing from the north, cold!

Although I don’t think anyone can accuse the city of FSJ of being beautiful, there are areas in the surrounding countryside that are lovely. And along the ridge just north of the city there are some places with beautiful views out over the Peace Valley.

On the bypass road that runs around the edges of the city, we found an abandoned farmstead with decrepit old wooden structures rotting in the fields.

Fall lasted about two weeks and the aspen trees turned yellow and gold.

We have been spending quite a bit of time with the cast and crew of the Buddy Holly Story, attending rehearsals at “The Space”, a quonset hut on the edge of town that serves Stage North as a rehearsal space.

Here is the Director Blair Scott in action, getting the Hayriders ready to go for their first song of the show.

Have a listen here. To plays the videos, first click on the image, then click again to start the video. Unfortunately, there was a bit of a problem with the sound on my video towards the end …

And here are Buddy Holly and the Crickets, going from country to rock ‘n roll.

Ty enters stage right carrying a keyboard. We are really enjoying being part of this production; it’s been great fun!

We are both working on the projections for the show, and have spent a fair bit of time in the theatre of the North Peace Cultural Centre where the show will take place the last two weekends of October.

We have put together two large projection screens from king size beds sheets sewn by the Sew it Yourself shop, four metal pipes, and lots of hardware. They will be hung on either side of the stage for videos which I edited of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper playing at the end of the show. This necessitates three laptops, three digital projectors, 150 meters of HDMI cord, and lots of metal hardware.

Oliver, the General Manager of the Cultural Centre, has been very generous with his time in helping us to put this all together.

Here’s a shot of the top of one screen, showing how it’s attached.

This is what it looks like with the big back screen and one of the side screens; the third one will hang down from stage right on the other side.

Here’s a little promo video I put together for the show.

Back when it was still Fall, we spend a bit of time getting to know the neighbourhood, strolling through the subdivisions around here.

This artificial pond has been made just down the road from our place. We are both amazed at the number of RVs parked in people’s driveways here; on some streets every home has a gigantic motorhome or RV next to the house.

I started taking bellydance lessons about a month ago at the Studio2Stage dance lesson emporium, with Suzon Tremblay, a very talented dancer and artist.

Unfortunately, my picture of her is not in focus.

Bellydancing is much more difficult than I thought, with hundreds of moves, some of which are difficult for this old, inflexible body. I am bad, but hope to get better during the course of the class.

Winter came early, very early – September 30, to be precise …

Here’s the view from our kitchen window. Although it’s no longer snowing today, there’s still snow on the ground and more expected tomorrow. We are having the snow tires installed this weekend. Already the temperature is hovering between 0 and minus 5 and it’s only the beginning of October. I wanted to see a snowy landscape, just not this early in the season!

I still need to get some serious winter gear; here’s a picture from the outside of the rehearsal space on the east edge of town.

Other than that, I am working on my landscape photo series and getting ready to do some painting. The landscapes are getting more fanciful – here’s a taste.

Charlie Lake with Ghost Trees

Aspen Landscape with Eastern Phoebe & Harvest Moon

Aspen Landscape with Phases of the Moon


Greetings from the North!

The view flying into Fort St John. Wow, it’s been a fast and furious month since I’ve landed in FSJ with Aran the cat in his carrier. The beast turned out to be a pretty good traveller, once he got over the shock of going through security at Vancouver airport.

After a pretty good dose of culture shock for the first few weeks, I am starting to settle in up here. I have decided to focus on the things I like every day rather than feel sad about what I’ve left behind. First up on that list is the people that I have met here, a wonderful bunch of very friendly and active folks from many different facets of the community, artists, theatre folks, yoginis, environmental people …

One of the very first things we did upon my arrival was to walk around the neighbourhood and check out the prospects. There are two sweet little “metaphysical” stores, Earthly Treasures and The Wisdom Tree, selling crystals and other goodies for spiritual contemplation.

The Arts Post is a nice studio space with a very active group of potters.

Possibly I might try to get back into ceramics here – the studio is well set up.

I have also connected with the Flying Colours Art Association, a wonderful and welcoming group of artists who have workshops, exhibitions, and a great studio to work in every second week. I hope to get into the studio and do some painting by the end of September; at the moment I’m working on a new series of infrared photographic images of the northern landscape. Here’s an example:


On the main drag through town is the Blacksmith Yoga Community studio, in the green building in the picture below. It’s a vinyasa studio, a style of yoga that I used to do with Kathryn Turnbull at the Roundhouse in Vancouver, but more demanding than what I’m used to. The first few sessions left me with pretty stiff muscles!

We are living in a new area at the western edge of the city, where townhomes and condo buildings have been constructed – at the moment we are in the middle of a construction site with trucks and machines coming and going. The number and size of the pickup trucks around here is amazing; even though our new car is the biggest I’ve ever had, it seems tiny in comparison. It still feels very decadent to me to just be able to hop in the car and go wherever I want after not having had a car for five years. (Thank you so much to all the friends who have so kindly given us lifts places over those years!)

Our unit is the second from the end in the left-hand building pictured below.

We checked out the Fall Fair north of the city last month, getting a feel for the country life.

A really active group here is the Spinners, Weavers, and Quilters and they had a big display of their work in one of the buildings.

We watched the cattle show, in which various groups of people brought in their beasts and paraded them around the ring for the judge’s assessment, some more skilfully than others.

We also saw some of the sheepdog show, with various doggies shepherding sheep into pens.

Horse-riding is also a big thing in these parts.

I had ridden past the Fort Bowling building on my bike when heading to the yoga studio but was unsure if it was actually in business or not. But, yes, it is definitely in business and we gave it a whirl. My arm was not really up to it, though – will have to strengthen the muscles to up my game.

It was fun, except for the burning pain in my forearm! Check out my style – I actually got a few strikes (a few less than Ty, though …)

On the northern edge of town is an urban forest called Fish Creek, a nice place to walk on a sunny day. I was a bit nervous about the prospect of bears, though; however, we did not see any evidence of them that day.

One of things that I do love here is the aspen trees; they are everywhere up here. We noticed right away that the trees are much, much smaller here.

Very close to the city is Beatton Park and Charlie Lake, a lovely picnic area.

There are paved separated bike paths along the main street and around the perimeter of the city, a very nice feature.

Since it is mostly flat, the city is pretty easy to get around on bikes. And not very much traffic, either, compared to what we’re used to.

On Ty’s week off, we took a road trip to Grande Prairie, Alberta, to get snow tires and see a bit of the countryside. The journey takes about two and a half hours each way, travelling south through Dawson Creek and Beaverlodge. We stopped and checked out the Philip J Curry Dinosaur museum in Wembley, Alta on the way.

This area is full of fossils, some of which are on display here.

Ty is not trying to steal a dinosaur bone; this pit is for visitors to practice being paleontologists by dusting the dirt off bones.

On the way back, we stopped in at the Dawson Creek Art Gallery, located in a decommissioned grain silo.

One of the really fun things that we’re doing is getting involved with Stage North, the local theatre company. They are producing the Buddy Holly Story, on stage for two weeks the end of October. Ty and I are helping out with projections and as stage hands. Ty is designing a projection system for videos that will play during the performance.

I’ve been to one rehearsal so far and thought it was great. Here are a couple of video clips of three of the songs they’re working on.

Good times!

Awash a Semi-Finalist at El Ojo Cojo International Film Fest in Madrid

Awash with landscape v1 (2).Movie_Snapshot

My film Awash has been selected as a Semi-Finalist at El Ojo Cojo International Film Fest in Madrid from Nov 4 – 12, 2016. El Ojo Cojo International Film Festival showcases fiction, documentaries and animation shorts and full-length films, in order to promote intercultural dialogue, featuring quality films that are not usually in the Spanish commercial market, and “raising awareness of the various facets of reality, trying not to fall into clichés.”

Soundtrack Hydroscope by Gallery Six, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial- Share Alike 4.0 International License. Remixed Lisa MacLean.

The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis Semi-Finalist at the Best Short Fest


My film The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis has been selected as a Semi-Finalist at the Best Short Fest in Lanark County, Ontario.

BEST SHORT FEST is proud to bring the world’s best short films to the big screen at the historic community theatre in Lanark County, Ontario – less than an hour from Ottawa, and the United States (New York state), and 3.5 hours drive from Toronto.

After over 30 years as a live performance venue, since 2003 the theatre has regularly screened the best international films in partnership with the Film Circuit, a division of the Toronto International Film Festival Group, and BEST SHORT FEST continues this tradition, showcasing the talents of independent filmmakers from far and wide.

See the trailer here.

Awash at the TrixXxieFest Film Festival


I’m happy to have my short film Awash presented at the 2016 TrixXxieFest Film Festival in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada. Soundtrack Hydroscope by Gallery Six, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial- Share Alike 4.0 International License. Remixed Lisa MacLean.

Awash with landscape v1 (3).Movie_Snapshot

Awash with landscape v1 (4).Movie_Snapshot

Awash is part of a series entitled Urban Pastoral focusing on Vancouver’s seaside landscapes. In this work my interest is in the ways pastoral green spaces such as parks, gardens, nature walks, forest preserves, and others reconnect humans with nature and how such spaces might change with global climate change, high waters, and heat. A constellation of forces, including economic pressures, rising sea levels, extreme weather, and shoreline erosion, is affecting coastal areas worldwide. In Vancouver, the consequences of these changes for our society are beginning to register in the collective consciousness with recent reports that our city is one of the top ten around the world threatened by high waters.

We begin along Vancouver’s foreshore beaches, where people play and relax. Gradually the waters rise and waves swamp the picnicking and play areas; the inundation begins and fires flare. Alien creatures appear in our waters. The video ends with us swimming with the fishes through a tropical kelp forest.

The video’s unnatural coloration and technological processes (such as infrared photography) suggest our mutating relationship with nature and its consequences. Images of natural beauty console us that everything we love about our everyday environment is not being lost, while the slight psychic dislocation caused by the technological interventions – curious colour palette and image inversions – hints at decay and dissolution.

Awash with landscape v1.Movie_Snapshot

Awash with landscape v1 (2).Movie_Snapshot

TrixXxieFest is a pop-up Festival featuring short films, videos and performances to inspire, challenge and amuse – powerful voices from around the world and here at home. This year’s festival is happening from Friday June 24th and Saturday June 25th, 2016 at The Cox and Palmer Second Space at the LSPU Hall in downtown St. John’s, Newfoundland. The weekend will be a jam-packed two days of live performances, installations, screenings, parties and a punk rock show. This year’s event features an International program of film and video shorts highlighting experimental video, film-making, animation, and short documentary.

See the schedule here.

Read more about the festival here.

Arrivederci New York – Hasta Luego!

Saturday dawned blue sky and sun so another walk through Central Park was in order to get to our destination of the American Museum of Natural History on the west side of the park.

Unlike the previous day, when there had been few takers for the horse rides, this sunny day attracted a lot of patrons for both the horses and the bike chariots.

We saw some beautiful blue birds being fed, and a fellow stroking a pigeon.

Strangely, to us, most of the green space is fenced off here. Some areas have signs advertising the space for “passive recreation” only. There are also a number of interestingly-designed children’s playgrounds fenced off from the rest of the park.

It was a pleasant walk up to 77th St and we saw a grand parade of walkers for a Children’s Cancer Cure procession wind their way along the road, along with the plumed horses, rocket racer cyclists, and bike chariots.

We also caught a few minutes of a couple of different Little League games, one with boys and the other with girls, all playing at more or less the same level.

There are quite a few dining and drinking pavilions in the park; in the sun, they look very pleasant.

Our route took us across the park and up the West Side to the Museum, whose lobby contains a couple of gigantic dinosaur skeletons. The lobby was packed with families and kids, all excited about the visit.

Our favourite rooms on this visit were the gem and mineral repositories, with their collections of fantastic crystals and meteorites.

We also saw a magnificent multi-coloured ammonite in one of the museum’s lobbies.

Museums are hot, hard work and we were dying for a beer on a sunny patio but that was not the easiest thing to find in this neck of the woods. We walked over to Broadway and finally found one patio that would sell us a beer at a Mediterranean food joint.

On the way back we paused briefly to people watch at Columbus Circle, crowded with both locals and tourists, all clusters around the many food trucks and trailers. Lots of halal meals here.

For our final evening in the big city we decided to have dinner Midtown and walk around the streets in the area.

Times Square was hopping as usual as we tried to find a place to eat.

We finally found a seat at Serafini’s on 49th and enjoyed some really great Italian food.

We capped off the evening by exploring Rockefeller Center, including the fantastic murals on the interior walls and ceilings, the art deco wall reliefs, the gardens, and the dry ice arena angel.

We found out that Sunday, our departure day, the Five Boro Bike Ride was taking over the streets of Manhattan so we were up and out of the Y early to make sure that we would not get caught in some kind of transit nightmare. Backtracking our trail on the subway and bus was pretty straightforward and we had no difficulty in arriving at La Guardia in plenty of time for our flight.

So long New York – It was a great trip! Who knows if we will see you again. Cheers!

Morgan Library, Whitney Museum and Broadway Theater

One of the great things I remembered from my last, long ago visit to New York City, was the JP Morgan Library, a repository of rare books, manuscripts, and art which we decided to check out on our second day in the city.

Since I had been here last, the Library has gained a fantastic new addition to its premises, greatly expanding the exhibition space.

I find smaller venues like this one much easier to take than the vast expanse of, say, the Met; the viewing experience is more manageable.

The entrance to the Library proper reminds me of a Renaissance villa or chapel with its beautiful harmonious architecture and marble cladding.

In one of the rooms is a collection of Mesopotamian cylinder seals and Egyptian cuneiform and hieroglyphs; the seals are the earliest form of printmaking, used to mark ownership or affirm identity.

In another section of the library is the Morgan’s collection of rare books, including three copies of the first printed book, the Gutenberg Bible, below.

And several rare Books of Hours are also on display. The Book of Hours is designed for prayer and contemplation, with images and text used for each specific hour of the canonical day.

Several of the rooms also have priceless paintings, such as this Madonna and Child tondo by Botticelli.

In addition to the permanent collection, the Library also hosts temporary exhibitions; on display now are books by Andy Warhol

and an exhibition of photographs entitled Sight Reading, with both historical and contemporary photos of the natural world.

We then made our way by subway down to Greenwich Village to check out the new Whitney Museum, riverside on Gansevoort. It was a bit tricky to find, since we’d inadvertently gone too far south on the train and had to backtrack through a somewhat confusing maze of streets. Ty decided he was not up for this particular viewing experience, so he staked out a resting spot outside on one of the metal chairs.

The museum is a large cement and metal structure, with outside viewing platforms and sculpture displays on the top three floors. Since the lineup for the elevators was huge, I elected to make my way to the top 8th floor via the staircases.

From the top floors, there is a commanding view out over the river and city below, including the High Line, a mile long park stretched along a disused rail line just below the museum.

Among the exhibitions was an interesting multi-media show about the post 9-11 state by Laura Poitras, including an installation in a darkened room in which visitors lay on a large bed-like couch to view the video screening on the room’s ceiling.

Several floors were taken up with a portrait exhibition drawn from the Museum’s permanent collection.

In one of the rooms, I spotted a fellow that we’d seen at the Met the other day with an unusual tie … he told me that it was part of a limited collection.

After rejoining Ty on the ground, we headed to a packed Bubby’s, right across the street, for some fried chicken.

After seeing the film the night before, we had to check out the High Line and walked part way along its length before strolling to a nearby subway station for the ride back.

Miles of walking required an hour of feets-up rest before we hit the road again for my first Broadway show at the Samuel J Friedman Theater for the just-opened critically acclaimed The Father, starring Frank Langella and Kathryn Erbe, her of Law and Order fame.

We elected to have a drink across the street at the Glass House Tavern, a standing-room only bar in which, when we appeared at the back of the room, a waiter quickly brought out and assembled a table for us to sit at – that’s service! In general, I found the service everywhere we went to be excellent here.

We arrived at the theater early, taking our seats near the front. The show was great, but grim, an account of the descent into dementia of the titular character played by Langella. The audience, not surprisingly considering both the subject matter of the play and the cost of the tickets, was old, very old, and some were very upset, crying as they left the theater.

Thus ended another wonderful day in the city.

See more pics here.

7th NYC Independent Film Festival 2016 here we come!

The raison d’etre for our being in New York, the 7th NYC Independent Film Festival, was held from April 27 – May 1, 2016, with my film, The Fire Ceremony II: Metamorphosis, being screened twice in the Art/Experimental category during the run. We were very excited about being there for the show and headed out on foot on Thursday evening for the premiere.

The venue, the Producer’s Club on 44th Street, looked as though it was only a few short blocks away on our map, so we decided that we’d eat dinner somewhere near it before the show. Carmine’s, an Italian place we’d chosen, was absolutely packed, so, after waiting for a bit, we decided to bail and find another, less-crowded place to eat, as the clock was ticking away. The Midtown theater district has a million places to eat and all of them are packed but we were able to secure a table at Mama Mia on the corner of 9th Avenue, just down from the Producer’s Club – huzzah!

We weren’t able to linger over a leisurely dinner, though, if we wanted to make the premiere, so it was dine and dash to the venue, right across the street from the eternally playing Phantom of the Opera, for which people were lined up down the block day and night.

Once inside, Ty and I received our official participant tags and tickets for free drinks.

It was fun meeting some of the other filmmakers before the show, including Peter Meng from New Jersey, director of Take the High Line,

and Dominik Pagacz from Montreal, director of Baleful Sloth.

Here are a few shots of my film from the Thursday night screening.

See more pics here. I was really pleased and proud to have had my film selected for the Festival and it was so great to be able to sit in the audience and watch the screening – good times!

NYC Independent Film Festival 2016 Program excerpt