Bright Nights (and Days) in June

(Above: Peter Vogelaar works on the sand sculpture celebrating the 25th anniversary of the North Peace Cultural Centre on June 6. – Aleisha Hendry Photo)
“It’s 10 feet high, 16 feet long, and, if you could lift it, weighs roughly 30 tons. Artist Peter Vogelaar has been plying his trade and etching out a massive sand sculpture at the North Peace Cultural Centre over the last week—his ode to the centre’s 25th anniversary celebrations taking place this weekend.

It’s a welcome and fitting return home for the former Fort St. John resident and business owner. “I’m sure I’m going to have tons of people coming up saying hi,” Vogelaar said last week. “I’m excited. I’m looking forward to coming back and seeing friends and helping to celebrate the cultural centre.”

With fellow artist Denis Kleine lending his hands to the project, the two are combining a series of images of some of the top performers who have played the centre and the locals who have enjoyed it in return.” (Matt Preprost, Alaska Highway News)

(Photo above Irene Gut)

It has been hot and sunny here for weeks, but of course the weather forecast for the big week-long June arts celebration was for torrential rain. Many eyes anxiously watched the skies and the weather report as it was modified from day to day. Luckily the projected downpour did not materialise until the end of the event and the celebration was held in good weather; good thing, or this incredible sand sculpture would have melted away like snow in the Sahara.

Friday June 9 events included the Miniprint show opening at Whole Wheat and Honey, the Federation of Canadian Artists opening at the Peace Gallery North and the Bright Nights In June Arts Gala in the Theatre at the North Peace Cultural Centre, bringing together loads of local talent. Here is the invitation with details:

Friday June 9th, 2017 – Bright Nights in June Gala
6:00pm:
1940’s themed evening, cocktails and hors d’oeuvres to commemorate 75 years of the Alaska Highway.
Peace Gallery North’s Exhibit Opening “Our Home and Native Land” to celebrate 150 years of Canada.
There will be a sand sculpture created over the previous week by Peter Vogelaar and Denis Kleine to celebrate our 25th anniversary. Please make sure you check it out before the Gala begins.
7:30pm:
Gala performance showcasing 25 years of the North Peace Cultural Centre
Join us to recognize and enjoy the arts as we support our local talent as well as headline performers who started their artistic journey right here in our community, including artists like world renowned composer Peter-Anthony Togni, tap dance prodigy Brock Jellison, and contemporary dancer Shannon May. We are also pleased to bring back some of our favorite performers, country singer Tom Cole, up and coming singer songwriter Tanisha Ray, pianists Dana Pederson and Wesley Phan, violinist Lance Stoney, as well as four local dance companies including Studio 2 Stage Dance Academy, The Move Dance Centre, Peace Fusion Dance Company, and FSJ Latin Dance.
It will be an evening to remember as we honour the talent of the past, present, and future in the North Peace region.

Note my logo on the brochure above …

Luckily, Ty was working days so he could join me for the evening’s festivities; here he enjoys a coffee and chat with Mary, one of the print artists. Along with the display on the walls, the print celebration included a door prize of relief prints and a raffle for one of the accordion book of hand-pulled prints, here arranged by Bev.

Ty & I purchased Mary’s raven woodcut, one of the inspirations for the print logo that I designed.

Mary, Charlie, Sandy and others did a wonderful job of setting up the exhibition, bringing in miniature easels for the tables.

After sampling the art and goodies there, we headed across the street to the Cultural Centre to catch up on the Gala events.

Parked outside the Centre is this campervan covered in portraits of Canadians, in celebration of Canada’s 150th Anniversary (well, it’s actually 15,000 years but who’s counting?). The Gala celebrates the Cultural Centre’s 25th birthday as well as the 75th Anniversary of the completion of the Alaska Highway.

Both Ty & I took a moment to pose in front of Sturgill, a gigantic moose crafted from driftwood by a local artist, now on permanent display in the Cultural Centre lobby. (I do wonder where she gets her driftwood, since there are no oceans anywhere near here … perhaps these are the remnants from the ancient ocean that used to cover this part of the world way back in the dinosaur era).

Here’s what Sturgill looks like from the front (photo Catherine Ruddell):

You may notice that Ty has shed some facial hair, rockin’ the Tom Selleck mustachioed Magnum PI look (he had to shave below the lower lip in order to be fitted for his required full face mask to protect against silica dust while on the site).

(Photos above and below by Twyla Jordan)

I had been unsure as to whether we’d be able to stay awake late enough to enjoy the Gala itself so hadn’t bought tickets (When you get up at five am, the evening ends pretty early). But at 5 minutes to the start, we both decided that, yes, we could do it, at least for the first few hours, joining the throng of culture mavens streaming towards the open theatre door.

Highlighted in the Gala were a number of dancers, one of which has gone on to become a professional dancer in the States, and troupes, musicians (a lot of country and a few classical), and actors (folks we knew from Stage North), all enjoyed by a large and enthusiastic crowd. Here are a few pics of the proceedings.

This group, the Energetic Dance Explosion, is a recent emergence onto the FSJ dance scene; they were great, especially the lead man, and the costumes, complete with multi-coloured flower headdresses and many sequins, were fabulous. They teach all kinds of Latin dancing – I may give that a whirl this winter.

When the first half of the show did not end until 9:30, we knew we had to beat a hasty retreat or we’d both be snoring in our seats for the second half. Apparently the show lasted 4 and a half hours – yikes!

Defying the weather predictions, Saturday dawned sunny and hot for the Big Print event in the Cultural Centre parking lot – huzzah! All the tents for the Art Market were set up the day before and the road roller was already on hand, just waiting for its foray into artmaking.

Alan, the Coordinator of the Gallery, had arranged for T-shirts to be made for the event, bright orange with a big blue roller logo.

Several members of the print group had their works on display and for sale (I understand that some sales were made) and were set up to do demos of relief printmaking.

Catherine, below, is a fabric artist who designs and cuts beautiful small block prints on rubber, used for stamping on fabric, a technique she learned in India.

Below you can see the quilt she’s made with the blockprinted fabrics. She also had several small works of printed fabric (framed below), one of which now has a home at our place.

Everyone was super excited and a bit nervous about the Big Printing, not having done it before. Alan researched the process online and watched a lot of video demos in order to get a handle on what needed to be done. Each artist had been given instructions on the size and depth of block to cut – 24″ by 48″ – to facilitate the printing procedure. Most were making relief prints and working on MDF particle board, but a couple used lino glued onto wood and Judy tried a collograph on matteboard (below is the plate).

Judy’s plate was gorgeous and very ingenious: she used a matte board support, onto which she placed real maple leaves. Glue was then applied  to the board with a gluestick and a sheet of heavy duty aluminum foil placed on top, more than covering the entire surface. The uninked plate was then rolled over by the road roller, sealing the foil onto the surface. Judy then folded over the edges of the foil to create a seamless surface for inking.

(Photo above by Irene Gut). Here is the plate, all inked up and glowing in the sun.

Here is the print itself, hanging on the metal fence to dry.

As the morning unfolded, it started to get hot and the inking table had to be moved into the shade because the ink was drying too fast. Below you can just see my back end on the left helping Mary ink her plate (photo by Irene Gut).

Alan had made a jig for the plates and here you can see one of them being placed in front of the roller, ready to go. After slipping the plate into the wooden jig, the beige fiberboard is added, then carpet underlay, and finally a piece of carpet, all sandwiched together in front of the roller.

Here are some photos of the action: it takes a village (or at least a soccer team’s worth of people) to pull this off.

Below you can see four of us working on inking up Catherine’s block, cut pieces of lino mounted on wood, to be printed on fabric. From Catherine: “This shape represents the small stone bead that was found at the Charlie Lake Caves when they were excavated by SFU in the early 1980’s. It was dated to be over 10,000 years old, and along with the other artifacts found at the site, they are considered to be the oldest evidence of paleo-Indian ritual acts in Canada.”

(3 photos above by Niki Hedges). Here is Catherine’s final work drying on the fence (photo by Irene Gut):

Below you can see the entire process of printing Diana Hofmann’s linocut, with imagery based on this passage from The Story of Mankind by Hendrik Willem Van Loon: ‘High up in the north, in the land called Svithjod, there stands a rock. It is a hundred miles high and a hundred miles wide. Once every thousand years a little bird comes to this rock to sharpen its beak. When the rock has thus been worn away, then a single day of eternity will have gone by.’

Here are a couple of details from the plate:

All the prints were really great and everyone loved the process. Although there had been some concern about how it would go, the day was a smashing success, with the crowd clapping and roaring its approval as each print was pulled off the plate and revealed. Here are the rest of the prints:

Alan’s two landscape linocuts (photos by Irene Gut):

Linda’s Eat Fresh and shellacked block:

Miep’s two Howling Wolves (photos Irene Gut):

And Mary’s Trees.

We also had a grad photobomb, recorded here by Niki Hedges:

Another fun part of the day was the printmaking for kids classes, relief on styrofoam taught by Diana, assisted by Arlene and another woman whose name I do not know, and gell printing by Sandy.

And, to top it off, live music all day long, this set by my playwright friend Deb and her band:

To see many more pictures, and video clips of all the plates being printed, click here.

After enjoying that wonderful weekend, Ty anad I headed to Beatton Park to walk the cross country skiing trails (now summer walking trails) on a beautiful sunny afternoon.

The variety of greens in the trees, foliage, and underbrush is amazing. We were alone in the forest this day, with the butterflies and birds.

There are a lot of Monarch butterflies in this part of the world, feasting on the multitudes of dandylion flowers that proliferate here.

Beatton Park has about 15 kilometers of X Country ski trails, now green and covered in many different types of low to the ground wildflowers.

The water level of the lake has receded the last few weeks and the beach is now open for business once again after having been flooded for a few months.

And I think I’ve discovered where the driftwood comes from in these parts; the lakeshore is covered in it in one section of the beach.

And, of course we had to pop in to the deck at Jackfish Dundee for a brew to cap the day – Carpe Diem folks!! Make hay while the sun shines.