North and South: spring creeps in slowly

Is anyone out there a cat whisperer? I need some suggestions to help me with my old orange tomcat who plagues me nightly. I have tried Marsha’s “cat-spooning” moves with no luck and am getting tired of his mad dashes up onto the bed and onto the middle of my stomach at all hours of the night. Even though he has food and water in the bedroom, these don’t seem to interest him; neither does lifting the covers of the bedclothes so that he can come under and curl up with me interest him. All he wants is to vocalise all night long and blow bad cat breath into my face. That, and be served with cold, running water from the bathroom taps anytime anyone heads in that direction.

Here is the culprit in the morning, all tuckered out and snoozing after he has spent a hard night farting around and meowing.

 

Spring in Fort St John: dirt, dust, mud, wind, brown everywhere, dirty black patches of ice and snow not yet melted, big ponds of water on the road, flooding water, rocks on the road everywhere (used instead of salt), pickup trucks covered head to toe in dirt. The dumpster in the parking lot outside our building continues to be a source of irritation to me.

I’m like one of those nosy old ladies who peeks through the curtains at the sound of her neighbours moving around – but, it’s the sounds of people throwing bags of garbage into the bin and missing that gets to me. I’d rather not look out my window and see the garbage bin overflowing and bags of trash blowing in the wind through the complex. Ah, the joys of semi-communal living. (BTW now, about 2 weeks later, the bin has been moved to a different location and it is emptied three times a week, rather than two – my prayers were answered! Or maybe it was those photographs of overflowing garbage that I emailed to the management company …)

We woke up to a flooded garage the other day – damn! The big pile of unmelted ice that’s been hanging around the end of our building started to melt with the higher temperatures and, since we do not have a resident building manager, there’s no one to keep track of what needs to be done; in this case, to dig trenches so that the melting water flows out to the street and not into our garages. Here Ty is trying to remedy the situation with a less-than-satisfactory tool (since we do not have a shovel).

And, a design or construction flaw also hampers the water management; since the cement area between our buildings is higher than the garage floor by a few inches, the water flows down into the garage and not into the storm drain … Because the garage is also a storage area, not just a place to park the car, I was pretty upset about it and, to top it off, after I had spent four and a half hours to squeegee out our garage, water kept flowing back in through a small hole in the cement between our unit and the one next door where the absent neighbour’s garage was still full of 5 inches of water. Ty solved the problem with a bunch of sand bags which I pressed into that corner.

More signs of spring – the trees continue to bud – I am hoping for actual flowers soon!

In further art news,  Miep’s studio has aquired a new embossing-like press, handmade by a local fellow – here Charlie demonstrates the intricacies of its operation.

Some of the group attended a weekend workshop in Dawson Creek with David Langevin and were practicing his tips, still using the subject matter of spruce trees. This time, though, the colours were different than those I used when I tried this exercise back last Fall: pinks, purples, and yellows instead of golds and Indian yellows. I prefer this palette (no secret, I guess!)

I enjoyed watching Mike work on his piece; he is an oil painter and this is one of the first times that he has worked in acrylic – a master, for sure! Below you can see the progression of his landscape.

I am participating in the Flying Colours group show Points of View at the Peace Gallery North – here is the poster for it:

All the works are based on Miep’s landscape photos; the idea is that people will be able to see the variety of artists’ points of view, all beginning from the same original source starting point. Below is the piece of mine that I like best; it is a combination of digital photography, collage, and acrylic paint on wood.

And this one, unfortunately a bit out of focus: digital infrared photography and collage on wood:

Below, in the corner, are two others, both acrylic and collage on canvas, along with some other examples featuring Miep’s lovely female moose. (Since I did see one moose last Fall – at least its back end disappearing into the trees – I felt like I could include a moose or two in my paintings)

The opening was well-attended and the crowd enjoyed Charlie’s introduction to the display, as did the artists, particularly his comment that “This is a good opportunity for you to use your credit card” to the assembled masses.

Because I am a newcomer to the group, the local arts reporter for the Alaska Highway News spent a bit of time talking to me about my work and experience here; her article was published in the local paper last week. Here is the article, if you’re interested.

In other art “news”, I am working on some new landscape pieces, acrylic and collage on wood – these are in progress at the moment:

And here is the logo that I designed for Print Artists North (a group of printmakers up here who are having a series of exhibitions and a print exchange over the new few months, and the poster advertising the shows (not designed by me).

On Ty’s last set of days off, we headed out to the far side of Charlie Lake for a walk in the Provincial Park there, thinking that it was spring. For the first time since last August, I had my street shoes on and Ty had his soft-sided ordinary boots. Well, we only got about 100 feet into the trails when we realised our mistake – there was still snow and a foot deep of mud everywhere. So we gingerly backtracked, swearing to always carry our snow and mud boots in the car with us after that. No walk for us that day!

The crystal formations in the melting snow were very cool, though (literally and figuratively!)

On the lake itself remnants of the winter ice fishing season were still there in the form of charred wood patches where the fishermen had sat keeping warm while awaiting their catch.

The lake isn’t nearly as beautiful in its melted state as before with a gentle covering of pure white snow, alas.

Eliza had shown me a beautiful photo she took in one of the local parks of trees reflected in melt-water ponds; I was inspired by it to photograph reflections on my walk along the pathway north of town a week back on a sunny Sunday. One of the really nice things about the north is that it is almost always bright and very often sunny – I love that!

I think it would be very striking to blow these up room size and cover the wall with them – life size trees to walk through in one’s own home.

These photos could be from anywhere; they remind me of an art piece called Leviathan by Kelly Richardson that I saw at the Contemporary Art Gallery in Vancouver a while back. It was a huge photo/video piece taken of a Louisiana swamp displayed in a darkened room – I was very impressed by it.

Here is a photo of that piece:

You can see a short video of Leviathan here. I love her work.

We had a whirlwind Easter long weekend trip to Vancouver and quick visits with some dear friends and family. The weather mostly co-operated; some spitting rain, some dramatic cloud formations, and a bit of sun were all on the weather menu.

On a morning walk up Main Street, I took pictures of the mural art on buildings.

I am not walking as much as I am used to up here in the North, mostly because the snow and ice make it difficult in the winter (not to mention the cold). And, since Brubin died, I miss those three daily walks we used to take around the neighbourhood in Vancouver. (I miss Brubin). But I love walking around on Main Street – always something interesting to look at.

I keep trying to get in to see the shows at the Burrard Art Foundation on Broadway when I walk past, but I’m never there at the right time and it’s always closed.

Our old neighbourhood looks mostly the same, with the exception of the two gigantic towers that have gone up in the next block in our absence. They tower over our stubby little building.

One thing we did notice while walking around downtown a few times is the number of empty storefronts, more than ever. With the price of real estate and the rise in property taxes, soon there will be nothing but condos in Vancouver. Most businesses will not be able to afford to be in business anymore if this keeps up.

We stopped to take a look at one formerly ugly back alley near the waterfront which has been tranformed with a colourful coat of paint. I fear that it will take more than coats of paint, though, to make this city livable for anyone other than the rich in the not too distant future. It was lovely to see the kids playing in that alley – would love to see all the downtown alleys tranformed with art.

I really miss the greenery and flowers of the south coast, so beautiful even in the constant rain!

Of course, while we were in Vancouver we had to walk the seawall, sit on “our” wooden bench, and take a ride on the little False Creek ferries. This is the bench that we used to stop at when taking Brubin for his afternoon walk in the summers.

In the picture below it really wasn’t the liquid lunch it looks like! We were hydrating while waiting for Christine to join us for brunch.

I am now officially obsessed with reflection pictures; the bottom image is Granville Island reflected in the mirror taken from Jill’s seawall condo kitchen (essentially the reverse of the image above taken through her front window).

Leaving Vancouver, Burrard Inlet was on golden fire with the sun; the mountains are stunning from above, all snow-covered and gleaming miles into the distance.

Back in FSJ to a foot of new snow! One of the folks up here had told me that there would be 6 snowfalls between the first springlike day and when spring really arrives for good – so far we are on the 5th in the time we’ve been back since Easter! (Now, a few days later the 6th snowfall is here). Here’s the view coming into the Fort St John airport:

Since there is no greenery or flowers up here yet, Ty & I took a trip to Dunvegan Gardens, a big plant nursery up the road and spent a bit of time wandering through all their greenhouses.

The flowers are just beginning to bud and were just being brought out into the light that weekend.

For those of you who follow photographers, I’m doing an Andreas Gursky with the photos below:

Below is one of Gursky’s photos (the only difference between his and mine is that his are worth millions and mine aren’t … hahaha).

Here Ty is choosing a few small plants for our living room (which we haven’t managed to kill yet, although came close this week).

On Ty’s last set of days off, in addition to our aborted walk through Charlie Lake Provincial Park, we also set out on what I thought was a drive to a beautiful lookout point over the Peace River Valley on the road to Hudson’s Hope, only to discover to my disappointment that I’d taken a wrong turn along the way and we were heading for the Yukon on a nondescript highway journey with no beautiful views of any kind to be found. We stopped at the Shepherd’s Inn, Mile 72, for lunch before turning around. They still had those round glass coffee pots and white ceramic mugs that I have not seen since the 1970s.

All for now – See more photos here.