Morgan Library, Whitney Museum and Broadway Theater

One of the great things I remembered from my last, long ago visit to New York City, was the JP Morgan Library, a repository of rare books, manuscripts, and art which we decided to check out on our second day in the city.

Since I had been here last, the Library has gained a fantastic new addition to its premises, greatly expanding the exhibition space.

I find smaller venues like this one much easier to take than the vast expanse of, say, the Met; the viewing experience is more manageable.

The entrance to the Library proper reminds me of a Renaissance villa or chapel with its beautiful harmonious architecture and marble cladding.

In one of the rooms is a collection of Mesopotamian cylinder seals and Egyptian cuneiform and hieroglyphs; the seals are the earliest form of printmaking, used to mark ownership or affirm identity.

In another section of the library is the Morgan’s collection of rare books, including three copies of the first printed book, the Gutenberg Bible, below.

And several rare Books of Hours are also on display. The Book of Hours is designed for prayer and contemplation, with images and text used for each specific hour of the canonical day.

Several of the rooms also have priceless paintings, such as this Madonna and Child tondo by Botticelli.

In addition to the permanent collection, the Library also hosts temporary exhibitions; on display now are books by Andy Warhol

and an exhibition of photographs entitled Sight Reading, with both historical and contemporary photos of the natural world.

We then made our way by subway down to Greenwich Village to check out the new Whitney Museum, riverside on Gansevoort. It was a bit tricky to find, since we’d inadvertently gone too far south on the train and had to backtrack through a somewhat confusing maze of streets. Ty decided he was not up for this particular viewing experience, so he staked out a resting spot outside on one of the metal chairs.

The museum is a large cement and metal structure, with outside viewing platforms and sculpture displays on the top three floors. Since the lineup for the elevators was huge, I elected to make my way to the top 8th floor via the staircases.

From the top floors, there is a commanding view out over the river and city below, including the High Line, a mile long park stretched along a disused rail line just below the museum.

Among the exhibitions was an interesting multi-media show about the post 9-11 state by Laura Poitras, including an installation in a darkened room in which visitors lay on a large bed-like couch to view the video screening on the room’s ceiling.

Several floors were taken up with a portrait exhibition drawn from the Museum’s permanent collection.

In one of the rooms, I spotted a fellow that we’d seen at the Met the other day with an unusual tie … he told me that it was part of a limited collection.

After rejoining Ty on the ground, we headed to a packed Bubby’s, right across the street, for some fried chicken.

After seeing the film the night before, we had to check out the High Line and walked part way along its length before strolling to a nearby subway station for the ride back.

Miles of walking required an hour of feets-up rest before we hit the road again for my first Broadway show at the Samuel J Friedman Theater for the just-opened critically acclaimed The Father, starring Frank Langella and Kathryn Erbe, her of Law and Order fame.

We elected to have a drink across the street at the Glass House Tavern, a standing-room only bar in which, when we appeared at the back of the room, a waiter quickly brought out and assembled a table for us to sit at – that’s service! In general, I found the service everywhere we went to be excellent here.

We arrived at the theater early, taking our seats near the front. The show was great, but grim, an account of the descent into dementia of the titular character played by Langella. The audience, not surprisingly considering both the subject matter of the play and the cost of the tickets, was old, very old, and some were very upset, crying as they left the theater.

Thus ended another wonderful day in the city.

See more pics here.

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