From Boca to Colomitos

Ty and I decided to spend the day in Boca de Tomatlan, about 30 minutes by bus south of Puerto Vallarta, a small fishing village which is the jumping off point for water taxis to points further south not accessible by road. After a busy, full bus ride of folks who mostly got off in Mismaloya, we were deposited on the highway near Boca and walked down the cement staircase to the town, accompanied by the sounds of the grader and workers fixing the road into town, obviously from having been washed out in the recent torrential rain storm. Noisy! And hot!

The town itself is unremarkable, a small burg of a few stores, some cement houses, a couple of rental apartments, and lots of baying dogs. The folks you see walking away behind Ty we later saw in Puerto Vallarta with several dogs which they take around every day as volunteer dog walkers for a rescue organisation.

Boca is located on a lovely small bay at the mouth of the Horcones river, in which lots of water taxis and other boats are parked. We saw some beautiful tiny white wading birds with very long legs hunting fish.

Although we hadn’t really planned on it when we set out this morning, we decided to hike around the point to the next beach over, since the noise of the working machinery was unappealing.

I had researched the hike from Boca to Las Animas, a beach further down the coast about halfway between Boca and Yelapa, and we had mused about doing it. Today’s walk, though, was spur of the moment.

After wading across the waterway, we found the trail on the far side of the bay and clambered up onto a cement walkway that passed along beside the houses and rental casitas of the far side of the bay.

Some of the houses along here are enormous, white-painted, and many-leveled, with beautiful flowers. We passed a gigantic Banyan-like tree with a huge canopy of branches and several cement terraces with diving platforms.

The trail then became a bit steep as we climbed up and up into the forest and skirted around the headland. Up along the ridge are several abandoned houses whose shells have been picked clean, possibly by vagrants.

After reaching the top we then carefully made our way down the far side of the ridge to a lovely small, secluded beach called Colomitos.

We were drawn like moths to light by the sign advertising “Beach Club” along the rocky cliff side. However, when we got there, the host told us the place was reservation only and that it was full. No room at the inn for these travellers and no beer to be had at the bar. We could, however, do take out. I bought 2 beers and asked for a bag of ice which the barkeep gave us. Apparently, there are three seatings a day at this place and folks are ferried over by water taxi from Boca. If we had wanted to take a boat back, we could have done so for 50 pesos each.

Once down on the beach and settled into a little patch of shade next to the rocks, I asked a few folks already there about the difficulty of the remainder of the hike to Las Animas and we decided that it was not for us this day – perhaps mas tarde.

We enjoyed our beers and the visit of a gigantic black Great Dane named Wilson. After an hour or so, we decided against the boat back and trudged our way back to Boca along the trail again. Then walk back was significantly easier than coming, with the exception of the steep hike back up the hill from the beach.

Being thirsty and a bit tired, we plopped ourselves down on Boca’s beach under an umbrella and toasted the afternoon with coronas and french fries before grabbing the bus back again. Good Times!

See a few more pics here.

More info about this hike and other beaches in the area surrounding PV here.

More info about Boca itself and the surrounding area here.

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